Feeds

Japan confirms world's fastest maglev plan

310mph, $45bn project

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

Japanese rail operator Central Japan Railway Co. (JR Central) has announced it will build the world's fastest maglev system, with 310mph (500km/h) vehicles running along a 180-mile (290km) track between Tokyo and central Japan.

According to Reuters, the 5.1 trillion yen ($44.7bn) project will be completed by 2025, and while JR Central has not confirmed the final destination, previous reports suggested a "first phase" between Tokyo and the central industrial city of Nagoya, with a later extension to Osaka.

A company spokesman confirmed that the new maglev, designed to replace the country's famous bullet trains, will outpace its Shanghai counterpart - currently the world's only commercially-operative example of the tech which flies at a modest 267mph (430km/h).

In China meanwhile, state media proudly reported earlier this month that the country's first 190mph (300km/h) bullet train has rolled off the production line, destined to cut journey times from 80 to 30 minutes on the 71-mile (115km) Beijing-Tianjin route, and due to enter service before the Olympics kick off in August next year.

Wang Yongping, a Ministry of Railways spokesman, explained that the streamlined aluminium alloy train is the "lightest of its kind in the world", and duly enthused: "China has joined an elite world club after Japan, France and Germany, to become the fourth country capable of turning out such high speed trains."

France is, of course, the operator of the world's fastest conventional tech train, which regularly reach 199mph (320km/h). Back in April, it broke the world's fastest "train on rails" record by accelerating a modified TGV to an impressive 356mph (574.8km/h). ®

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

More from The Register

next story
PORTAL TO ELSEWHERE scried in small galaxy far, far away
Supermassive black hole dominates titchy star formation
Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around
Surprises at the nano-scale mean our ideas about how they charge could be all wrong
Edge Research Lab to tackle chilly LOHAN's final test flight
Our US allies to probe potential Vulture 2 servo freeze
Europe prepares to INVADE comet: Rosetta landing site chosen
No word yet on whether backup site is labelled 'K'
Cracked it - Vulture 2 power podule fires servos for 4 HOURS
Pixhawk avionics juice issue sorted, onwards to Spaceport America
Archaeologists and robots on hunt for more Antikythera pieces
How much of the world's oldest computer can they find?
Who wants to be there as history is made at the launch of our LOHAN space project?
Two places available in the chase plane above the desert
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.