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IBM forges Solid acquisition

Xmas shopping for in-memory database software

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

IBM announced this morning that it will buy privately-held database software developer Solid Information Technology for an undisclosed sum.

Solid's in-memory database software allows quick retrieval of data from a computer's memory (or RAM). Using the technology, enterprises can access and store data at speeds up to ten times faster than using traditional disk-based database systems. The approach also offers speedy system recovery benefits.

Hundreds of customers worldwide in sectors including telecommunications, retail, finance, health care, and other industries use its technology to provide high speed and high availability to data, Solid boasts.

Solid says 2007 revenues should hit about $14.4m, Reuters reports. IBM said it expects the deal to close in the first quarter of 2008.

IBM and Solid, which has traded for 14 years, have previously been partners. Big Blue said that getting its hands on the technology will allow it to broaden its information on demand portfolio. ®

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