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Tiger Team brings haxploitation to TV

Penetration testing telly show up against the Queen

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The haxploitation genre is coming to the small screen with a forthcoming series about a team of penetration testers.

Tiger Team follows a group of elite freelance security consultants hired to test organisations' security by using social engineering, hacking, and physically defeating security mechanisms. So we expect to see our heroes picking locks and going through the trash to get clues all the while maintaining an uneasy relationship with their clients and law enforcement officials.

The plot elements have appeared before in films such as Sneakers, starring Robert Redford. It's hard to see how a story arc strong enough to sustain interest over the course of a TV series can be sustained from these elements.

The first programme is due to screen at 11pm on Christmas Day on CourtTV, which is hardly a recipe for a large audience. On the plus side, those watching will be probably too sozzled to notice any plot holes or technical errors.

A radio interview with the stars of the show - Ryan Jones and Chris Nickerson - by a Denver station can be found here. ®

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