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Sony updates PS3 protein-probe program

Folding@Home tweaked for firmware 2.10

Security for virtualized datacentres

Sony has rolled out the latest version of the Stanford University-created Folding@Home protein analysis utility for the PlayStation 3.

Folding@Home distributes the task of analysing how protein molecules fold and unfold across millions of connected computers, including the PS3. It's hoped that the analysis will reveal how these processes can lead to diseases like Cancer, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.

The new PS3 Folding@Home client, version 1.3, can now play music off the console's hard drive while it's screensaver-like front-end busily polishes off peptides. Tracks feature automatically within categories, including Recommended, Energetic, Calm, Dramatic, Upbeat or Electronic. Users can browse through categories and tracks by utilising simple hotkeys or via the PS3's Music menu.

Folding@Home can now automatically turn a PS3 off after a specified amount of time up to 23 hours and 50 minutes, or after the completion of a current work unit. Sony also said the code has been tweaked to handle more complex protein simulations.

Version 1.3 requires PS3 firmware 2.10, which Sony posted yesterday. It can be downloaded direct to the PS3 from the console's Network menu.

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