Feeds

Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo! settle un-American activity claims

$31m appeases gambler-hating government

High performance access to file storage

Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo! have spilled a total of $31.5m to settle claims they promoted one of the most un-American of activities: online gambling.

Today, the US attorney for the eastern district of Missouri - that's St. Louis country - announced that the tech-happy trio agreed to resolve charges that they took money from online-gambling houses to advertise online-gambling services that facilitate real, live online gambling.

Microsoft is the biggest loser, forking over a cool $21m. $4.5m goes to the US government. $7.5m goes to the International Center for Missing and Exploited Children (ICMEC). And $9m will back an internet-based public service ad campaign that aims to tell youngsters that online gambling is completely illegal in the land of the free.

Meanwhile, Yahoo!'s settlement totals $7.5m ($3m to the government and $4.5m for public service ads), and Google will turn over $3m.

"These sums add to the over $40 million in forfeitures and back taxes this office has already recovered in recent years from operators of these remote-control illegal gambling enterprises,” read a canned statement from US attorney Catherine Hanaway. “Honest taxpayers and gambling industry personnel who do follow the law suffer from those who promote illegal online behavior.”

According to Hanaway's office, the settlements "involve corporate conduct the government found in violation of the Federal Wire Wager Act, federal wagering excise tax laws and various states’ statutes and municipal laws prohibiting gambling." But officially, the three web giants neither contest or admit the charges against them. ®

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
Putin tells Snowden: Russia conducts no US-style mass surveillance
Gov't is too broke for that, Russian prez says
Lavabit loses contempt of court appeal over protecting Snowden, customers
Judges rule complaints about government power are too little, too late
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Don't let no-hire pact suit witnesses call Steve Jobs a bullyboy, plead Apple and Google
'Irrelevant' character evidence should be excluded – lawyers
Edward Snowden on his Putin TV appearance: 'Why all the criticism?'
Denies Q&A cameo was meant to slam US, big-up Russia
EFF: Feds plan to put 52 MILLION FACES into recognition database
System would identify faces as part of biometrics collection
Record labels sue Pandora over vintage song royalties
Companies want payout on recordings made before 1972
Ex-Tony Blair adviser is new top boss at UK spy-hive GCHQ
Robert Hannigan to replace Sir Iain Lobban in the autumn
Judge halts spread of zombie Nortel patents to Texas in Google trial
Epic Rockstar patent war to be waged in California
Reprieve for Weev: Court disowns AT&T hacker's conviction
Appeals court strikes down landmark sentence
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.