Feeds

T-Mobile and 3 hook up for 3G coverage

Taking the best from both and still failing to cover the UK

Security for virtualized datacentres

T-Mobile and 3 are to combine their 3G radio networks in the UK, increasing coverage for both companies and reducing running costs.

The agreement follows a similar deal between Vodafone and Orange, announced earlier this year. Rather than being a coverage issue for these two operators however, the main driver was cost-reduction.

T-Mobile evolved from One-2-One, a company whose business model was based on providing coverage within London's M25, and while 3 has been busy building a 3G-only network it started a lot later than the competition. Both companies have significant holes in their 3G coverage of the UK landmass.

3 operates around 7,500 base stations, which will rise to 13,000 after the merger. This would appear to compare badly with Vodafone's 15,000 (as of January this year), but the latter includes 2G-only cells while 3 is only interested in 3G technologies.

Running separate networks made sense when companies competed on coverage, but today's customers are much more interested in the cost of calls and network reliability than if they can stay in touch from the north coast of Scotland. So combining network infrastructure makes a lot of sense.

But 3, and T-Mobile, also want the to expand their ability to offer in-home broadband. O2, Orange and Vodafone all offer ADSL connections, while T-Mobile and 3 are dependent on their 3G capability, and keen to offer mobile broadband as a competitor to fixed technologies.

The frequencies released by the switch off of analogue TV, and more flexible spectrum licensing, are going to create opportunities for new entrants in the mobile broadband market, so existing operators are going to want to make the most out of their assets while they're still worth having. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
EE buys 58 Phones 4u stores for £2.5m after picking over carcass
Operator says it will safeguard 359 jobs, plans lick of paint
MOST iPhone strokers SPURN iOS 8: iOS 7 'un-updatening' in 5...4...
Guess they don't like our battery-draining update?
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.