Feeds

Toshiba unwraps 'world's first' HD DVD-RW laptop

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Toshiba demo'd its laptop-friendly HD DVD-RW drive in June this year and, six months on, the unit is at long last going to be built into a laptop.

The machine in question is Toshiba's own monster Qosmio G40, which goes on sale in Japan this Friday. The 17in notebook also contains a 2.2GHz Core 2 Duo T7500 processor, 2GB of memory, two 200GB hard drives and an Nvidia GeForce 8600M GT graphics chip with 256MB of graphics memory attached.

Toshiba Qosmio G40

Toshiba's Qosmio G40: now with HD DVD-RW

The GPU drives the 1920 x 1200 display, which is more than enough for full HD pictures - though the G40 also has an HDMI port so user can hook the laptop up to an HD TV too. Or they can tune in using the laptop's two on-board tuners.

But it's that HD DVD-RW drive that's generating the most interest around the web. It reads and writes both burn-once HD DVD-R media as well as the rewriteable version in both single- and dual-layer forms. It'll also handled DVD±R/RW discs, DVD-RAM and CD-R/RW.

The G40 will retail for around ¥400,000 ($3538/£1752/€2450).

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.