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US woman launches 'Taserware' parties

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An enterprising Arizona woman has redefined the Tupperware party paradigm for the 21st century, and is hosting girlie get-togethers where security-conscious women can get to grips with the US's fave non-lethal lethal weapon - the Taser.

According to the Arizona Republic, Dana Shafman, founder of Shieldher Inc, has already hosted Taserware bashes in Phoenix and Scottsdale, offering hands-on experience of the Taser C2, which can then be bought for $300, or $350 with the optional laser sight.

Shafman explained: "I felt that we have Tupperware parties and candle parties to protect our food and house, so why not have a Taser party to learn how to protect our lives and bodies?"

Her customers agree. Debi McMahon, who attended the first Taser party in Scottsdale, described herself as "excited" by the electrifying Taser experience. She said: "I feel like I'm 6 feet tall and 250 pounds. I'm going to buy one for my mom. It's going to be her 81st birthday present."

The Arizona Republic points out that, for safety reasons, the Taserware parties feature a cardboard cut-out rather than a shouty UCLA student for target practice, and no alcohol is available, just in case someone overdoes the sherry and goes Taser-crazy.

The only cause for concern among mothers was the C2's range of colours - black, blue, pink and silver - some of which might lead their kids to view the weapon as a toy. Mum-of-two Caily Scheur said: "I want to protect my children from [the Taser] just as much as I want to protect myself by using it."

Scheur explained that once she took delivery of her C2, she'd keep it locked in a box under the bed with the keys out of the kids' reach. She will, of course, have to wait for the obligatory background check before she can activate her Taser via the manufacturer's website or with a quick phone call to Taser Inc.

Shafman, meanwhile, plans to extend her party network to those states where the Taser is legal. For every 10 Tasers party reps sell, they'll get a free example to lock in a box under their own bed.

The Taser is prohibited for consumer use in Hawaii, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin. ®

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