Feeds

Honda shows off space-dwarf robot butler capability

Also plans droids to 'work on street corners'

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

The Japanese robot industry is streets ahead of the competition when it comes to designing droids for peaceful uses (for war-bots, of course, the discerning purchaser shops in America). That said, Japanese robots have so far struggled to find a real, erm, killer application.

This is perhaps because the robo-designers of Japan tend to strive for overly worthy uses: caring for the elderly, construction work, that type of thing. Plainly, this will never inspire people. Now, however, we might have something that people will buy.

Asimo: now serves drinks

Take this shit away and get me a large gin.

That's because Honda has finally programmed its mildly interesting but ultimately purposeless Asimo robot to do something useful: serve drinks.

At last, the robot butler or bartender could finally be on the way, and humanity will be freed from the crushing burden of mixing its own drinks. It's like the invention of the wheel. For some of us, anyway.

Honda showed off the droids' new capabilities in Tokyo yesterday.

According to AP: "The bubble-headed robots can recognise drink choices and carry a tray with the requested drink to the person who placed the order.

"The Asimo... looks like a child in a white spacesuit."

Apparently, Honda has also enabled the dwarvish droids with other abilities. They can seemingly dodge round drunken human masters, for instance - a useful skill for waiters who are only 51 inches tall and thus below many people's field of vision.

There are some worrying hints in the AP story, however. For one, it seems the robo-butlers so far may only be able to serve tea and similar muck, known to be fatal to even the hardiest constitution.

Secondly, there was a truly disturbing suggestion that Honda intends its stunted spacesuit robots to serve other basic human needs.

"By the end of 2010s, we'd like to see these robots working at every street corner of the city," Honda's Tomohiko Kawanabe said, according to AP. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Antarctic ice THICKER than first feared – penguin-bot boffins
Robo-sub scans freezing waters, rocks warming models
I'll be back (and forward): Hollywood's time travel tribulations
Quick, call the Time Cops to sort out this paradox!
Your PHONE is slowly KILLING YOU
Doctors find new Digitillnesses - 'text neck' and 'telepressure'
Reuse the Force, Luke: SpaceX's Elon Musk reveals X-WING designs
And a floating carrier for recyclable rockets
NASA launches new climate model at SC14
75 days of supercomputing later ...
Britain's HUMAN DNA-strewing Moon mission rakes in £200k
3 days, and Kickstarter moves lander 37% nearer takeoff
prev story

Whitepapers

Go beyond APM with real-time IT operations analytics
How IT operations teams can harness the wealth of wire data already flowing through their environment for real-time operational intelligence.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Website security in corporate America
Find out how you rank among other IT managers testing your website's vulnerabilities.