Feeds

ITIL deeds don't go unpunished

Of carts and horses

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

It shouldn't be a surprise as to why IT's automation needs often fall to the bottom of the stack: because most companies are not in the technology business, investments in people, processes, or technologies that are designed to improve IT only show up as expenses on the bottom line. And so while IT is the organization that is responsible for helping the rest of the business adopt various automated solutions, IT often goes begging when it comes to investing in its own operational improvements.

That, in a large part, explains the 20-year "overnight success" of ITIL. Conceived as a framework for codifying what IT actually does for a living, the latest revisions of ITIL describe a service lifecycle that provides opportunity for IT to operate more like a services business that develops, markets, and delivers those services to the enterprise as a whole. In other words, it's supposed to elevate areas that used to pass for "help desk" and "systems management" into conversations that could migrate from middle manager to C-level.

Or at least that's what it's supposed to be cracked up to being. If you codify what an IT service is, then define the actions that are involved with every step in its lifecycle, you have the outlines for a business process that could be made repeatable. And as you codify processes, you gain opportunities to attach more consistent metrics that track performance.

We've studied ITIL and have spoken with organizations on their rationale for adoption. Although the hammer of regulatory compliance might look to be the obvious impetus (e.g. if you are concerned about regulations covering corporate governance or protecting the sanctity of customer identity, you want audit trails that include data center operation), we also found that scenarios such as corporate restructuring or merger and acquisition also played a hand. At an ITIL forum convened by IDC in New York last week, we found that was exactly the case for Motorola, Toyota Financial Services, and for Hospital Corp. of America - each of whom sat on a panel to reflect on their experiences.

They spoke of establishing change advisory boards to cut down on the incidence of unexpected changes (that tend to break systems), formalizing all service requests (to reduce common practices of buttonholing), reporting structures (which, not surprisingly for different organizations, varied widely), and what to put in your Configuration Management Database (CMDB) that is stipulated by the ITIL framework as the definitive store defining what you are running and how you are running it.

But we also came across comments that, for all its lofty goals, suggest ITIL could wind up erecting new silos for an initiative that was supposed to break them down. One attendee, from a major investment bank, was concerned that with adoption of the framework would come pressure for certifications that would wind up pigeonholing professionals into discrete tasks, a la Frederick Taylor. Another mused about excessive reliance on arbitrary metrics for the sake of metrics, because that is what looks good in management presentations. Others questioned the idea of whether initiatives, such as adding a change advisory board or adding a layer of what were, in effect, "account representatives" between IT and the various business operating units it solves, would in turn create new layers of bureaucracy.

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

More from The Register

next story
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
KDE releases ice-cream coloured Plasma 5 just in time for summer
Melty but refreshing - popular rival to Mint's Cinnamon's still a work in progress
Leaked Windows Phone 8.1 Update specs tease details of Nokia's next mobes
New screen sizes, dual SIMs, voice over LTE, and more
Another day, another Firefox: Version 31 is upon us ALREADY
Web devs, Mozilla really wants you to like this one
Put down that Oracle database patch: It could cost $23,000 per CPU
On-by-default INMEMORY tech a boon for developers ... as long as they can afford it
Mozilla keeps its Beard, hopes anti-gay marriage troubles are now over
Plenty on new CEO's todo list – starting with Firefox's slipping grasp
Apple: We'll unleash OS X Yosemite beta on the MASSES on 24 July
Starting today, regular fanbois will be guinea pigs, it tells Reg
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.