Feeds

Nokia sees a good future for Nokia

Swallows red pill, sees Web 2.0 everywhere

Best practices for enterprise data

By the year 2012 a quarter of all content will be user-generated and passed between friends, rather than being created and distributed by today's media brands, according to interviews with "trend-setting consumers".

The Future Laboratory spoke to 9000 consumers on behalf of Nokia, all of whom are described as "active users of technology" and thus can be trusted to tell us what the world's going to look like.

As Nokia's Vice President, Multimedia, Mark Selby describes it thus:

"We think it will work something like this; someone shares video footage they shot on their mobile device from a night out with a friend, that friend takes that footage and adds an MP3 file - the soundtrack of the evening - then passes it to another friend. That friend edits the footage by adding some photographs and passes it on to another friend and so on."

All of which will be done on their mobile phone, obviously.

Driving users to prefer content mashed up by friends, as opposed to professionally-produced, are four trends which The Future Laboratory and Nokia have identified through their research.

Immersive Living reflects the way people are always on-line, while Geek Culture is a reflection of how everyone wants high-tech toys these days - at least, all the people interviewed for this study. G Tech is technology for girls - apparently not just technology for boys painted pink - and Localism sees users taking pride in content produced by their locality.

All in all it's remarkable how closely this research matches Nokia's ideal vision of the future. Consumers using mobile phones to create and mash up content, taking power away from the media brands and placing it in the hands of those running the portals and controlling the mobile user experience.

Now if they can just get rid of those power-hungry network operators then Nokia's plan for world domination will be complete, at least until the pills wear off. ®

Recommendations for simplifying OS migration

More from The Register

next story
Trying to sell your house? It'd better have KILLER mobile coverage
More NB than transport links to next-gen buyers - study
iWallet: No BONKING PLEASE, we're Apple
BLE-ding iPhones, not NFC bonkers, will drive trend - marketeers
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Scotland's BIG question: Will independence cost me my broadband?
They can take our lives, but they'll never take our SPECTRUM
NBN Co adds apartments to FTTP rollout
Commercial trial locations to go live in September
Samsung Z Tizen OS mobe is post-phoned – this time for good?
Russian launch for Sammy's non-droid knocked back
Speak your brains on SIGNAL-FREE mobile comms
Readers chat to the pair who flog the tech
prev story

Whitepapers

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?