Feeds

Verizon fondling Google Android?

Strange bedfellows

Using blade systems to cut costs and sharpen efficiencies

Verizon continues to embrace what it once despised.

One week after the mega-telco announced that it would open its wireless network to non-Verizon devices and applications, chief executive officer Lowell McAdam has told Business Week that the company will "get behind" Android, the very open mobile phone operating system recently announced by Google.

Does this mean the company will use Android on its own mobile phones? That's still unclear. "We're planning on using Android," is what McAdam told BusinessWeek. "Android is an enabler of what we do."

If this is true, Verizon isn't doing what it did just a few weeks ago. When Google announced Android in early November, it was backed back by more than 30 members of the new Open Handset Alliance, including wireless operators Sprint Nextel and the Deutsche Telekom-owned T-Mobile. But Verizon's name was conspicuously absent.

This was no surprise. Verizon's network has always been completely closed to third-party devices and applications, and in recent months, the company has fought particularly hard to keep it that way. After the FCC attached an open access requirement to the so-called 700-MHz band, a prime portion of the US wireless spectrum to be auctioned off in January, Verizon tried to quash the decision via a US court of appeals.

In a petition filed with the court, Verizon called the FCC's decision "arbitrary, capricious, unsupported by substantial evidence, and otherwise contrary to law".

But after the court refused to fast-track the case, meaning things wouldn't be decided before auction time, Verizon dropped its complaint. And now that Google has mounted a considerable army behind Android and announced its own plans to bid for the 700-MHz spectrum, Verizon has completely changed its tune. To put it mildly.

Last week, the company said it would open its network to third-party devices by the end of 2008, and though it wouldn't officially back Android at the time, McAdam now seems to have done so.

That said, a Verizon spokeswoman tells us that the company has not yet decided whether to use Android on its own phones. In speaking with Business Week, she says, McAdams was merely saying that third-party developers would have the option of using Android on devices they might build for the network.

"We fully expected the some in the development community are going to embrace Android in the devices and application they develop and bring to out network," says Nancy Stark. "But Verizon Wireless has not decided whether we're going to use Android in any devices that we offer." ®

HP ProLiant Gen8: Integrated lifecycle automation

More from The Register

next story
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
Microsoft unsheathes cheap Android-killer: Behold, the Lumia 530
Say it with us: I'm King of the Landfill-ill-ill-ill
All those new '5G standards'? Here's the science they rely on
Radio professor tells us how wireless will get faster in the real world
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
US freemium mobile network eyes up Europe
FreedomPop touts 'free' calls, texts and data
Oh girl, you jus' didn't: Level 3 slaps Verizon in Netflix throttle blowup
Just hook us up to more 10Gbps ports, backbone biz yells in tit-for-tat spat
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.