Feeds

Sun itching to release its virtualization platform

xVM Ops Center gets a price tag

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

Have ready some clean towels and a cardboard box, Sun Microsystems is whelping the first in a litter of virtualization products next month.

Sun is sneaking off to a nice quiet closet to birth xVM Ops Center, the physical and virtual resource management stack for the xVM product family. This puppy will be available January 8, 2008.

The software is based on the open-source Xen hypervisor project. The lineup will eventually center around xVM Server (the hypervisor part) and xVM Ops Center (the management part). Compare the concept to virtualization leader VMWare's ESX and Virtual Center respectively, and you shouldn't be too far off.

Sun pegs xVM Ops Center as a all-in-one virtualized datacenter "automation tool" (read: does stuff like discovery, monitoring, OS provisioning, updates and patches) using a simple, Ajax-based interface. It's a shakeup of Sun's N1 Systems Manager (N1SM) and Sun Connection, formerly known as Update Connection Enterprise, formerly known as Aduva OnStage.

Ops is friendly to cross-platform Linux and Solaris OS-based x86 and SPARC environments.

Oren Teich, xVM director of marketing, says you can take a new machine out of the box, plug it in, and Ops takes over. The software can manage thousands of systems simultaneously — implementing patches and updates at the get-go, then automating administrator tasks such as provisioning, monitoring, system tracking and...more updating. You can always use a good updating.

Sun is heralding in Ops by releasing the source code used to build the software on the OpenxVM.org community site this month. The Common Agent Container source code will hit Dec. 10, 2007.

In Jan., a distribution of Ops Center will be made available via free download. The commercial version will cost $10,000, which includes on-sight installation and training. After that, the price of admission is $100-$350 annually, depending on the feature set selected.

Teich couldn't give a firm date on when the rest of the xVM lineup will be gestated, but said it should definitely arrive before the second quarter of '08. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway
Combine Blu-ray and M-DISC and you get this monster
US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux
OAM takes wireless signals to 32 Gbps
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Apple flops out 2FA for iCloud in bid to stop future nude selfie leaks
Millions of 4chan users howl with laughter as Cupertino slams stable door
Students playing with impressive racks? Yes, it's cluster comp time
The most comprehensive coverage the world has ever seen. Ever
Run little spreadsheet, run! IBM's Watson is coming to gobble you up
Big Blue's big super's big appetite for big data in big clouds for big analytics
Seagate's triple-headed Cerberus could SAVE the DISK WORLD
... and possibly bring us even more HAMR time. Yay!
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.