Feeds

Sun itching to release its virtualization platform

xVM Ops Center gets a price tag

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Have ready some clean towels and a cardboard box, Sun Microsystems is whelping the first in a litter of virtualization products next month.

Sun is sneaking off to a nice quiet closet to birth xVM Ops Center, the physical and virtual resource management stack for the xVM product family. This puppy will be available January 8, 2008.

The software is based on the open-source Xen hypervisor project. The lineup will eventually center around xVM Server (the hypervisor part) and xVM Ops Center (the management part). Compare the concept to virtualization leader VMWare's ESX and Virtual Center respectively, and you shouldn't be too far off.

Sun pegs xVM Ops Center as a all-in-one virtualized datacenter "automation tool" (read: does stuff like discovery, monitoring, OS provisioning, updates and patches) using a simple, Ajax-based interface. It's a shakeup of Sun's N1 Systems Manager (N1SM) and Sun Connection, formerly known as Update Connection Enterprise, formerly known as Aduva OnStage.

Ops is friendly to cross-platform Linux and Solaris OS-based x86 and SPARC environments.

Oren Teich, xVM director of marketing, says you can take a new machine out of the box, plug it in, and Ops takes over. The software can manage thousands of systems simultaneously — implementing patches and updates at the get-go, then automating administrator tasks such as provisioning, monitoring, system tracking and...more updating. You can always use a good updating.

Sun is heralding in Ops by releasing the source code used to build the software on the OpenxVM.org community site this month. The Common Agent Container source code will hit Dec. 10, 2007.

In Jan., a distribution of Ops Center will be made available via free download. The commercial version will cost $10,000, which includes on-sight installation and training. After that, the price of admission is $100-$350 annually, depending on the feature set selected.

Teich couldn't give a firm date on when the rest of the xVM lineup will be gestated, but said it should definitely arrive before the second quarter of '08. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future
Or why the reversal of globalisation ain't gonna 'appen
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Bitcasa bins $10-a-month Infinite storage offer
Firm cites 'low demand' plus 'abusers'
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
CAGE MATCH: Microsoft, Dell open co-located bit barns in Oz
Whole new species of XaaS spawning in the antipodes
Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
AWS pulls desktop-as-a-service from the PC
Support for PCoIP protocol means zero clients can run cloudy desktops
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.