Feeds

Canadian loses $20K in phony eBay sale

Account hijacking continues

High performance access to file storage

A Canadian man was scammed out of $20,000 when he tried to buy a car through eBay.

Shaqir Duraj, a baker from Calgary, thought he was dealing with a reputable seller because the person had a 98-per cent customer satisfaction rating. The refugee from Kosovo had already made high-ticket purchases off eBay, buying a big oven for the bakery he owns.

It turns out he was another victim of an eBay account take-over, in which scammers hijack the account of a legitimate seller and use it to list fraudulent auctions. Six weeks after he wired $20,000, he has yet to receive the vehicle, according to this article from the CBC. When Duraj reported the fraud to eBay, the company told him to contact the police and FBI.

While the vast percentage of eBay transactions are legitimate, the internet is littered with accounts of people who lost large sums of money while shopping on the popular site. In some cases, the con artists infect their victims with a sophisticated Trojan that causes their browser to display fraudulent pages from eBay and third-party websites used by automobile buyers, such as Carfax. One woman lost $8,600 after her machine was infected by the malware, which Symantec dubs Trojan.Bayrob.

Duraj is one of about 1,000 Canadians who have been scammed since 2000, according to a RCMP official.

eBay guarantees auto purchases for up to $20,000, but only if the transaction is carried out on the website. In Duraj's case, the buyer appears to have paid through a wire transfer, which makes him ineligible for the protection.

"Unfortunately, because the transaction occurred off eBay, he/she was not covered by our vehicle purchase protection program," an eBay spokeswoman said. She added that the victim continued to communicate with the scammer even after the hijacked account had been shut down.

The company strongly advises customers to use the official PayPal payment system when making purchases. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts
Bloke behind the cockup says not enough people are helping crucial crypto project
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released
File under 'this is going to hurt you more than it hurts me'
Experian subsidiary faces MEGA-PROBE for 'selling consumer data to fraudster'
US attorneys general roll up sleeves, snap on gloves
Bad PUPPY: Undead Windows XP deposits fresh scamware on lawn
Installing random interwebs shiz will bork your zombie box
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.