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LogLogic eyes new CEO Sueltz as IPO propeller

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Seasoned software whiz Pat Suetlz has turned up as LogLogic's new CEO.

Most recently, Sueltz served as CEO at British censorware firm Surf Control - a company bought in April by Websense. Before that role, Sueltz worked as President of Salesforce.com and before that as the head of software and then services at Sun Microsystems. Er, and before that, Sueltz was a flashy software executive at IBM.

The executive inherits a bubbling success story with LogLogic, which has doubled revenues year-over-year for the past three years, according to former CEO Dominique Levin, who is now an EVP at the company.

LogLogic has enjoyed such a rise in sales thanks to its constant compliance push. The start-up urges customers to create log warehouses where they can keep track of major actions taking place within a company, such as which employee accessed or changed a file on a specific date or whether a fired worker has been properly cut off from IT systems. In addition, customers can run analytics across their log data and receive "big picture, animal book type reports," Sueltz told us.

Quite clearly, Sueltz has been brought on with the intention that LogLogic will go public. The company's board must have felt a bit of industry muscle was needed to pull this off.

When Sueltz bailed on Sun for Salesforce, many industry watchers expected her to inherit the CEO role at the CRM deliverer. It would seem, however, that founder Marc Benioff was not willing to give up that kind of control.

Always good for a laugh, Sueltz said that the LogLogic people came knocking at her door in the post Surf Control days.

"I think that meant I was old and still like to work and wasn't ready to hang up my keyboard," she said. "So, now we're going to look at how we can take this technology into the enterprise."

"For me, the opportunity to see if I can scale this and take this to a public offering at some point is just an opportunity that I could not pass up.

"I like working with highly intelligent people because it keeps me tall, thin and young. Well, none of the above really. But it keeps me enthusiastic." ®

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