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LG KU990 Viewty cameraphone

Give a phone a touchscreen and suddenly everyone's interested

Even so, the KU990's user interface centres on the touchscreen. The UI has been designed to be primarily finger-operated rather than stylus dependent. LG does supply a stylus, but there’s no slot for it in the phone itself.

You can move some elements on screen by dragging your finger – such as the clock on the standby screen, or you can drag images around in the gallery – but there isn’t the same fluidity of movement you get with the iPhone, for instance. There's some vibration feedback whenever you press the screen and choose functions, giving that reassurance that buttons have been keyed properly - and preventing accidental and sometimes annoying double-pressing. However, this switches off when you change the phone’s alert setting to vibrate only or to silent.

LG KU990 Viewty mobile phone
Nice stylus, but where do you stick it?

On the standby screen, you have four unlabelled icons ranged at the bottom of the display. These take you to the main menu - with four further unlabelled sub-menus - the phone's numeric pad, a list of messaging options and a contacts directory.

Despite no overt labelling, the sub-menu icons' functions are easy to guess. There are options for phone functionality, multimedia, the organiser, tools and browser, and one for settings. You’d be hard-pressed to get lost, as the next level of functions are clearly labelled.

Back at the standby screen, the KU990 also offers an alternative, standard menu layout for quick access to key features. Tap the standby screen and a strip of moving chevrons appear towards the bottom of the display. Another tap here and a three-by-three grid flows in from the side. This colourful grid is more like something you’d see on a standard mobile main menu – but if you want to get back to the more minimalist look, just tap the screen as before and the grid will slide off the page again.

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