Feeds

Google permits Dell to sell Dell servers

Search appliance alliance

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Dell has cuddled right on up to Google, agreeing to hawk search appliances directly to customers.

A deal like this has been in the making for some time, since Dell actually provides the hardware for the Google Search Appliance. Google has relied on the PowerEdge 2950 rather than making custom hardware as it does for its own data centers. There is, however, some level of customization that takes place to turn Dell's box into an indexing wonder.

Customers can buy the search system from Dell, starting at $30,000. Meanwhile, a trimmed down search appliance - the Google Mini - starts at $1,995.

The Google Search Appliance and Mini appear to have pretty similar base innards, although the Mini can only search up to 300,000 documents while the full Appliance can search up to 30m. In addition, the Appliance supports searches on software such as databases, Lotus Notes and Microsoft SharePoint instead of just web sites, file shares and the like.

Or, as Dell puts it,

The Google Search Appliance, with its distinctive bezel and yellow chassis, is designed for larger enterprises, while the blue Google Mini is targeted for the small and medium business market. These appliances deliver relevant search results from information sources within a company’s firewall. Companies can also design their own interface that users recognize from their familiarity with Google.com, without compromising existing corporate security requirements.

Interested folks can compare and contrast the hardware here at Google or here at Dell.

The major thrust of this deal, if there is one, stems from Dell's continued willingness to sell varying kinds of gear.

For example, Dell this month signed on to ship systems outfitted with Sun's Solaris operating system. In addition, the Texan-firm is planning to use Sun's ZFS file system on upcoming storage gear.

Dell's newfound flexibility apparently comes straight from the top with Michael Dell - he of one brain - looking to shake things up since his return to the CEO post. ®

Register editor Ashlee Vance has just pumped out a new book that's a guide to Silicon Valley. The book starts with the electronics pioneers present in the Bay Area in the early 20th century and marches up to today's heavies. Want to know where Gordon Moore eats Chinese food, how unions affected the rise of microprocessors or how Fairchild Semiconductor got its start? This is the book for you - available at Amazon US here or in the UK here.

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
AMD's 'Seattle' 64-bit ARM server chips now sampling, set to launch in late 2014
But they won't appear in SeaMicro Fabric Compute Systems anytime soon
Brit boffins use TARDIS to re-route data flows through time and space
'Traffic Assignment and Retiming Dynamics with Inherent Stability' algo can save ISPs big bucks
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.