Feeds

Hacker defaces temples to OS X

Apple fanboys crawling with maggots

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

A self-described Apple user, presumably fed up with the smug superiority of "Mac," the hipster mascot featured in the ubiquitous "Get a Mac" commercials, is targeting OS X enthusiast sites with defacements that accuse them of excessive fanboyism.

Problem is, the stunts appear as forced and manufactured as the Apple campaign itself.

Over the past week, a person going by the name Malcor claims to have tagged at least four Mac blogs with graphics that cast the Cupertino company in a less-than-favorable light. They include images of rotten and bruised Apples being defiled by maggots and other pests and petition Mac users to exercise a bit of restraint.

"This is a message to the rest of the Mac community, so listen up," the defacement reads. "Ever heard of hubris? Tone it down and you will not be attacked."

screenshot of defacement on iphonematters.com

Malcor has even chronicled the "hacks" in a blog titled Rotten to the Core, where the persona talks up the ability to penetrate the security of websites that have been tagged.

"And make no mistake, I don't mean to imply that I'm the worlds [sic] greatest hacker and can work my magic on any site," Malcor writes here. "The #1 site I'd love to take down for all its Apple fanboism is digg.com but I doubt I'll be able to find any exploit holes on a site so big."

Over the past several years, Apple has emerged as a bigger target to cyber miscreants, in large part thanks to the growing popularity of its flagship Macs, the wide deployment of its iTunes and QuickTime software and cultish fanaticism of the iPhone status symbol. Several weeks ago researchers uncovered a sophisticated porn Trojan that targets Mac users. We were starting to think Malcor was part of the same zeitgeist.

The thing is, the defacements aren't really hacks at all, at least according to one publisher who says images posing as defacements on Apple Matters and iPhone Matters were, in fact, ill-considered "publicity stunts" that were designed to appear as breaches.

"The site was not hacked," a person who works for Apple Matters told us. "I was contacted by someone [and asked] to pretend it was a hack and it was a mistake."

The screeds have since been removed and replaced with an apology by the publisher of the sites. (Our thanks to the authors of this entry on the McAfee Avert Labs Blog for spotting the defacements.)

Of course, someone who was hacked might be simply saying the defacements were a hoax rather than admitting his system was breached. And Glenn Wolsey, publisher of the eponymous Glenwolsey said in an email that the hack of his site was genuine. Ah, the intrigue! ®

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
LibreSSL RNG bug fix: What's all the forking fuss about, ask devs
Blow to bit-spitter 'tis but a flesh wound, claim team
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
NUDE SNAPS AGENCY: NSA bods love 'showing off your saucy selfies'
Swapping other people's sexts is a fringe benefit, says Snowden
Own a Cisco modem or wireless gateway? It might be owned by someone else, too
Remote code exec in HTTP server hands kit to bad guys
British data cops: We need greater powers and more money
You want data butt kicking, we need bigger boots - ICO
Crooks fling banking Trojan at Japanese smut site fans
Wait - they're doing online banking with an unpatched Windows PC?
NIST told to grow a pair and kick NSA to the curb
Lrn2crypto, oversight panel tells US govt's algorithm bods
prev story

Whitepapers

Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.