Feeds

Intel to debut GPU-in-CPU chips in 2009

PCI Express 2.0 to become the system bus

Security for virtualized datacentres

Intel's first next processors based on its next-generation 'Nehalem' architecture are due to appear a year from now, in Q4 2008. But the really interesting models will arrive during the first half of 2009: desktop and mobile CPUs with integrated graphics cores.

The chip giant's roadmap currently has the first Nehalems, codenamed 'Bloomfield', coming on stream late next year and targeting gaming PCs, just as this month introduction of the first Core 2 Extreme 'Penryn' processors did. Like Penryn, Nehalem is designed to fabbed using a 45nm process.

Bloomfield's speeds are not yet known, but it's expected to use a new, 1366-pin interconnect. As we've reported before, that forms the basis for the CPU's QuickPath bus, which links its four cores - each, don't forget, including HyperThreading (HT) technology to allow them to operates as two cores for a total of eight - to three channels of DDR 3 memory, according to a report on Japanese-language site PCWatch.

The gaming chip has 8MB of shared L2 cache and connects to the 'Tylersburg' ancillary chip, which provides a route through to the ICH10 I/O chip and the PCI Express 2.0 bus, where the graphics card will sit.

Bloomfield appears to be something of a stop-gap product, because roadmaps seen by PCWatch show a follow-up part, 'Lynnfield', due in H1 2009. It cuts the interconnect down to 1160 LGA pins and the adoption of PCI Express as the chip-to-chip bus.

Lynnfield is a quad-core part, again with HT to allow it to operate as eight cores, and with 8MB of L2. It too supports DDR 3, but only in a dual-channel configuration, the report indicates. The CPU's on-board PCI Express controller allows it to link directly to a x16 graphics card, while its I/O chip, 'Ibexpeak', connects by DMI (Direct Media Interface).

The same architecture will be used by 'Cleaksfield/Clarksfield' - there's some confusion over the name - the Nehalem-era mainstream quad-core part. However, this chip uses a 989-pin rPGA interconnect.

So too wil 'Auburndale', while is said to be a mobile chip, implying that Cleaksfield/Clarksfield is too. Auburndale is a dual-core product - HyperThreading makes it appear as a quad-core chip to the operating system - with 4MB of L2 and dual-channel DDR 3 support.

Like Cleaksfield/Clarksfield it will use PCI Express as its system bus to connect to a discrete GPU. But this will be optional: Auburndale will sport an integrated GPU of its own, along with a directly connected video memory buffer.

Once again, Ibexpeak provides the I/O, over a DMI link.

There'll be a desktop version of Auburndale, codenamed 'Havendale', which will use the same LGA1160 interconnect as Lynnfield.

Then, in H2 2009, Intel will introduce 32nm die-shrink versions of these processors, all based on the 'Westmere' architecture.

AMD's Fusion processor, which likewise integrates multiple cores, specialist chippery and, potentially, GPUs all on the same processor die, is also due to debut in 2009. Earlier this year, AMD said the first Fusion processors would be mobile chips.

New hybrid storage solutions

More from The Register

next story
Apple iPhone 6: Missing sapphire glass screen FAIL explained
They just cannae do it in time, says analyst
Slap my Imp up: Bullfrog's Dungeon Keeper
Monsters need to earn a living too
Oh noes, fanbois! iPhone 6 Plus shipments 'DELAYED' in the UK
Is EMBIGGENED Apple mobile REALLY that popular?
Apple's big bang: iPhone 6, ANOTHER iPhone 6 Plus and WATCH OUT
Let's >sigh< see what Cupertino has been up to for the past year
Apple Pay is a tidy payday for Apple with 0.15% cut, sources say
Cupertino slurps 15 cents from every $100 purchase
The Apple Watch and CROTCH RUBBING. How are they related?
Plus: 'NostrilTime' wristjob vid action
Apple's SNEAKY plan: COPY ANDROID. Hello iPhone 6, Watch
Sizes, prices and all – but not for the wrist-o-puter
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.