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Impartiality and the BBC

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Beeb Week Recently, we discovered that some of the evidence in Al Gore's film about climate change, An Inconvenient Truth, was fictional. But was this the result of a classic exposé from Panorama, or from Newsnight?

In fact, the Gore revelations followed from the persistence of a school governor from Devon, who mounted a High Court challenge to the distribution of the film in schools. In this case, the BBC was the watchdog that didn't bark.

For Auntie, maintaining a reputation for impartiality is a far more intractable task than shrugging off fraudulent phone-in shows. Forget complaints from the Murdoch press, or from blogs devoted to BBC bias. At stake is something deeper.

Take an issue like Sudan. Whatever Mia Farrow and George Clooney say, there's room for controversy here. But that isn't what BBC world affairs correspondent Paul Reynolds thinks. When Gordon Brown gave a speech to the UN at the end of July, Reynolds wrote that it "coincided with a welcome development over Darfur in the form of a pending Security Council resolution approving the despatch of a UN-led peacekeeping force – at long last".

Plenty of balance there.

If we all know for certain and agree that genocide is actually going on in Sudan, then we all know for certain and agree that UN action is long overdue.

As for climate change: although environmentalists feel the BBC isn't doing enough, the only criticism the BBC gives of Gordon Going Green is that... he isn't doing enough.

Here, in trendy style, the Beeb plays the cynical oppositionist. But there's a further twist. In practice, the Beeb's campaign to get us all to stop emitting is now so ceaseless, even the BBC Trust is worried. In a summer discussion of the corporation's role, From Seesaw to Wagon Wheel, the trust fretted:

The BBC has held a high-level seminar with some of the best scientific experts, and has come to the view that the weight of evidence no longer justifies equal space being given to the opponents of the consensus. But these dissenters (or even sceptics) will still be heard, as they should, because it is not the BBC's role to close down this debate. They cannot be simply dismissed as "flat-earthers" or "deniers", who "should not be given a platform" by the BBC.

Yes, even a discussion of balance must be balanced. On the one hand, there's a consensus in climate science, so it must have most airtime; on the other, there are of course consensus-opponents who must be allowed their moment.

Two things escape the Beeb.

First, any consensus about climate change by no means implies that there's a cut-and-dried political consensus on exactly what to do about it.

Second, climate science - like research into cancer - has come a long way, and pretty fast too. Yet – again like cancer research – there's still an enormously complex mountain to climb.

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