Feeds

123-Reg takes weekend off

Domain name servers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Updated Pipex's hosting service 123-Reg suffered a weekend of downtime thanks to broken hardware.

The Reg received emails from many of those hit. One said: "Nameservers have been down for 48+ hours this weekend, loosing [sic] me around £3k across my four more popular domain names.

"No explanation on there [sic] website as to what caused the problems. Bloody ridiculous."

One poster on a hosting bulletin board complained: "The most upsetting thing is that there is NO way to get hold of them... they make you wait an hour and dont answer the phone... they dont answer tickets."

A spokesman for Pipex, which owns 123-Reg, told us the company saw its domain name servers fail on Friday afternoon and got them back online on Sunday morning. He said: "Yes there have been problems relating to domain name servers - we've got new hardware in place now and things should be working fine." The company promised a statement on the problems soon.

123-Reg last suffered problems as a result of the floods in Sheffield in June. In December 2006 it had email problems which it blamed on an unexpectedly large amount of image-based spam.

We'll update this story with 123-Reg's statement when we receive it.

123-Reg sent us the following statement:

123-reg experienced intermittent performance issues on its DNS servers between late afternoon on Friday 16 November and Sunday 18 November. This meant that some customers have encountered difficulties with their domain names during this period.

This problem was caused by a combination of excessive loading on the DNS servers and a rare hardware failure. During this time, 123-reg engineers have replaced the hardware and full service has been resumed.

We apologise to our customers for the inconvenience that the outage would have caused and we have begun an investigation to identify the cause of the failure, and any necessary actions required will be implemented without delay. Further information and updates is available from http://www.hosting-status.pipex.net

®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
'Serious flaws in the Vertigan report' says broadband boffin
Report 'fails reality test' , is 'simply wrong' and offers ''convenient' justification for FTTN says Rod Tucker
This flashlight app requires: Your contacts list, identity, access to your camera...
Who us, dodgy? Vast majority of mobile apps fail privacy test
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.