Feeds

Powering the mobile experience

Our pollsters' assault on battery life

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Reg Technology Panel Deep in the heart of Gotham City, a gang of arch-criminals descends on the central bank. The plan: to execute the most audacious heist ever. What can stop them? Nothing! Unless... across the windswept street, from the darkest confines of a garbage-strewn alleyway emerges our masked hero, the caped crusader.

"Not today!" he announces sternly, as he closes on the motley crowd. From his pocket he withdraws a device so powerful it can halt time itself. In a single, smooth motion he wields the black cylinder like the haft of a sabre, pushing the small red button on its side as its arc descends towards the villains.

Nothing happens, because its battery has run out. "Bugger," he says, before receiving a right kicking from the soon-to-be-rich, criminal masterminds.

Poor Batman is not alone, according to our intrepid force of Register readers. Top of the list in our recent "future of mobility" survey was battery life. Here we see the business users, but there's a similar picture for personal usage:

improved battery life

Fortunately, not all requirements are quite as insurmountable as battery life.

A close second in the priority list is flat rate internet access - for reasons we've seen elsewhere in this study series, such as predictability of costs and convergence of functions, this is clearly something that would make people's lives easier.

Given the amount of fuss about international roaming at the moment, it's interesting to see that it comes in only third for business users (and fifth for personal users, if you're interested).

While these topics are addressed, it will be interesting to see what manufacturers - particularly laptop vendors - can come up with to give us more power to our fingertips. Initiatives such as One Laptop Per Child (OLPC), with its reduced-functionality, low-power mode of operation illustrate the potential for innovation in this area.

Perhaps just supplying laptops with a spare battery in the box, or even coming up with some kind of voltage and power tip standard so that we'd only need one kind of supply wherever we are, might that be the answer?

What do you think? Answers on a fully charged postcard, please. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Virgin Media so, so SORRY for turning spam fire-hose on its punters
Hundreds of emails flood inboxes thanks to gaffe
A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally
Breakfast in London, lunch in NYC, and your clothes in Peru
AT&T threatens to pull out of FCC wireless auctions over purchase limits
Company wants ability to buy more spectrum space in auction
Turnbull leaves Australia's broadband blackspots in the dark
New Statement of Expectations to NBN Co offers get-out clauses for blackspot builds
Facebook claims 100 MEEELLION active users in India
Who needs China when you've got the next billion in your sights?
Facebook splats in-app chat, whacks brats into crack yakety-yak app
Jibber-jabbering addicts turfed out just as Zuck warned
Google looks to LTE and Wi-Fi to help it lube YouTube tubes
Bandwidth hogger needs tube embiggenment if it's to succeed
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.