Feeds

Warner Music supremo in Apple-fondling mea culpa

'Jobs was right. I was wrong.'

Security for virtualized datacentres

Two years after he publicly badmouthed iTunes, Warner Music Group CEO Edgar Bronfman Jr. now thinks it's just peachy.

Speaking earlier this week at the GSMA Mobile Asia Congress in Macau, Bronfman admitted that the music industry was dead wrong about the digital music revolution, before spewing some Apple sweet talk that still has us wondering whether someone had a gun to his head.

"Take it from us music industry folks," Bronfman said. "We used to fool ourselves. We used to think our content was perfect just exactly as it was. We expected our business would remain blissfully unaffected even as the world of interactivity, constant connection and file sharing was exploding. And of course we were wrong."

He acknowledged that Warner Music Group (WMG) and the other mammoth record labels had gone so far as to attack their own customers. "How were we wrong?" he asked himself. "By standing still or moving at a glacial pace, we inadvertently went to war with consumers by denying them what they wanted and could otherwise find...and as a result of course, consumers won."

But that was just a warm up. Hoping to show that Warner is now very serious about delivering digital tunes to nifty mobile gadgets, Bronfman started channeling Steve Jobs.

"You need to look no further than Apple’s iPhone to see how fast brilliantly written software presented on a beautifully designed device with a spectacular user interface will throw all the accepted notions about pricing, billing platforms and brand loyalty right out the window," he said. "And let me remind you, the genesis of the iPhone is the iPod and iTunes — a music device and music service that consumers love."

Yes, this is the same Edgar Bronfman Jr. who tussled with Steve Jobs over iTunes back in 2005, calling it's 99-cent pricing model "unfair" and "indecent". But now he's seen the light. Or there's a gun to his head. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
The 'fun-nification' of computer education – good idea?
Compulsory code schools, luvvies love it, but what about Maths and Physics?
Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots
We know what the Doctor does, stop going on about it already
'Cowardly, venomous trolls' threatened with TWO-YEAR sentences for menacing posts
UK government: 'Taking a stand against a baying cyber-mob'
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
Don't bother telling people if you lose their data, say Euro bods
You read that right – with the proviso that it's encrypted
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.