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Red Hat and Hyperic have meeting of the mimes

Sorry, minds

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Red Hat and systems management specialist Hyperic have formalized their ties. The companies now plan to create an open source systems management package that will run across Red Hat's portfolio.

Up until now, Red Hat's JBoss unit showed Hyperic the most love. It developed code on top of Hyperic's base software as part of the JBoss Operations Network. That work will continue and should benefit from more communications between Red Hat and Hyperic. The two companies plan to discuss roadmaps and work to share core more liberally. In fact, Red Hat will contribute its code to the open source Hyperic project.

Moving forward, this Hyperic systems management base should stretch across Red Hat's systems management portfolio.

"Within the next six months, we'll unveil a project and ecosystem around the collaborative effort," Hyperic CEO Javier Soltero told us. "It will be a best of breed result of both of our work."

Hyperic's software covers a broad set of systems management tasks, including the monitoring of hardware, OSes and applications. One particularly nice feature of Hyperic HQ is the presence of a large library of plug-ins that can be wrapped around things such as J2EE applications, databases and virtual machines. With such code intact, customers can monitor the performance of their software.

Semi-pro blogger and Alfresco exec Matt Asay described this partnership as a move in the right direction for both companies.

"Given how fundamental Hyperic is to Red Hat's business through JON, this is a critically important move for Red Hat. It's also a vote of confidence in Hyperic. Perhaps most importantly, it's a way to advance the platform and make it open source, something that Red Hat has talked about for the past year but which hadn't materialized."

We're not sure what the partnership does for mimes. ®

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