Feeds

Punters call for laptops with built-in mobiles

GSM/Microsoft ask 'how can we improve your notebooks'?

The essential guide to IT transformation

The most sought-after notebook computer improvement is the addition of a built-in mobile phone, a survey has found.

Microsoft teamed up with the GSM Association (GSMA), a trade body which promotes mobile phone adoption and standardisation, to ask punters what they would really like in their notebook computers.

Pyramid Research carried out the survey of 12,000 punters across 13 countries, and found that 88 per cent of respondents would like to see mobile broadband built into their sub-$1,000 notebooks.

We'd all like to see instantaneous access to the internet from wherever we are, ideally for free, so it's unsurprising that those surveyed felt the same. One can only wonder what the other 12 per cent were hoping for.

The survey also found that 60 per cent of respondents would happily buy a mobile contract with their notebook, but only 15 per cent were interested in an additional module to handle phone-network connectivity, currently the most popular way of achieving ubiquitous internet access.

To encourage development of embedded GSM technology, the GSMA is asking manufacturers to send over their designs, and promises to show off the best one come the Mobile World Congress (the show formerly know as 3GSM) in February.

Network operators have been keen to support the idea, which should also come as no surprise, but they should be worried by the details of the study.

Fifty-seven per cent of those who want to see a mobile phone embedded in their notebook computer are in the Asia Pacific region, only 15 per cent come from North America (possibly due to the pervasiveness of Wi-Fi), and a mere 11 per cent were from Europe, perhaps reflecting European cynicism over the cost of mobile data. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
EE plonks 4G in UK Prime Minister's backyard
OK, his constituency. Brace yourself for EXTRA #selfies
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.