Feeds

Red Hat turns to Platform for Linux cluster charge

Getting its Rocks on

3 Big data security analytics techniques

SC07 Red Hat and Platform Computing have opted to attack the high performance computing realm together.

The software makers this week touted a partnership will see Platform marry its Open Cluster Stack with Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The end result? The Red Hat HPC Solution, of course.

Linux remains the dominant force in the clustering market. And this deal opens a chance for Red Hat to capitalize on that success.

Red Hat gains access to Platform's cluster manager, file system, workload manager and development tools. The management software helps out with things such as cluster installs and job scheduling.

As it happens, Platform already ships OCS for RHEL and CentOS. Now, however, we see Red Hat branding and promoting its own product. Red Hat plans to reveal a list of supported hardware for the software by the end of this year. In addition, it looks to make special cluster packages aimed at smaller customers.

Red Hat made this announcement at the Supercomputing conference here in Reno where Platform also promoted Version 5 of OCS.

"Platform OCS 5 has been developed specifically to improve performance and simplicity, while also lowering the costs of supporting and operating an HPC infrastructure," Platform said. "Traditionally, cluster deployments are time, service and personnel-intensive, with an average install time per node of three to four minutes. Supporting an image-based install, Platform OCS 5 can cut deployment time by up to 75 percent — making it one of the fastest cluster deployment toolkits available."

OCS relies on some of the open source Rocks cluster software developed at the San Diego Supercomputer Center. ®

Bootnote

While Platform plugged Rocks in its statement about this partnership, we're told that Project KUSU is the base of OCS.

Register editor Ashlee Vance has just pumped out a new book that's a guide to Silicon Valley. The book starts with the electronics pioneers present in the Bay Area in the early 20th century and marches up to today's heavies. Want to know where Gordon Moore eats Chinese food, how unions affected the rise of microprocessors or how Fairchild Semiconductor got its start? This is the book for you - available at Amazon US here or in the UK here.

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.