Feeds

Tumbleweeds outnumber punters, as iPhone's First Night flops

Let me through - I'm a journalist

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

The UK iPhone launch had generated acres of newsprint, with papers outdoing each to signify the importance of the "event". But rarely have the media elites shown that they don't have a clue what they're doing.

Nick also posits the subversive idea that the "queue" that formed outside Apple's flagship shop on London's Regent Street may be synthetic.

Ian in Southampton is delighted with his iPhone, offered this analysis in a post to Slashdot that's so spot-on it's worth reprinting the best bit.

"I have no doubt that the iPhone will be a success here, it's just Apple misjudged the launch a little," he writes.

As to why, I'm sure everyone knows, but here's a recap as to why it's not the saviour of the UK's mobile industry:

1. We're used to either paying for the phone, or the contract, but not both.

2. We're used to accessing mobile internet on 3G, which was rolled out wider and earlier here than across the USA.

3. There have been several competing devices launched recently, which appeal to a range of demographics; for example, techies will like the N95 while fashion victims will like the Prada wotsit.

4. It's quite chunky as phones go - which might sound pernickerty but the market here is very much geared towards fashionable, neat phones (for example, no manufacturer would dare launch a phone with an aerial here within the last few years as they look so dated, while I hear they're still available in the US).

Which is very fair.

Apple's plan to steamroller the networks, which worked in the fragmented US market, doesn't quite translate to a Europe market - which is far more competitive, and where a wide range of fashionable phones pop up annually at little or no cost to the consumer.

Apple needn't worry that its product line is out of kilter with the world's tastes, however. The wonderful user interface Apple has created for the iPhone translates even better to the iPod. British consumers - who like to boast about a bargain - may decide they can have the best of both worlds: keep the phone they have, and buy an iPod Touch.

Apple may also take some comfort from the fact that it was raining, and that with a recession looming, the British have switched to paying for their mortgages on credit cards - so there's not a lot of discretionary cash left over.

Especially not imaginary discretionary cash - to spend on an imaginary event.

The only people who should really be embarrassed are the newspapers and TV channels, who'd convinced themselves a world-shattering event was about to take place.

Come Friday, they were the only people in the stores. ®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
Scotland's BIG question: Will independence cost me my broadband?
They can take our lives, but they'll never take our SPECTRUM
Trying to sell your house? It'd better have KILLER mobile coverage
More NB than transport links to next-gen buyers - study
iWallet: No BONKING PLEASE, we're Apple
BLE-ding iPhones, not NFC bonkers, will drive trend - marketeers
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Speak your brains on SIGNAL-FREE mobile comms firm here
Is goTenna tech a goer? Time to grill CEO, CTO
NBN Co adds apartments to FTTP rollout
Commercial trial locations to go live in September
Samsung Z Tizen OS mobe is post-phoned – this time for good?
Russian launch for Sammy's non-droid knocked back
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Maximize storage efficiency across the enterprise
The HP StoreOnce backup solution offers highly flexible, centrally managed, and highly efficient data protection for any enterprise.