Feeds

Prosecutor concludes opening in Reiser trial

'Single reason explains it all, and that's that this man killed her'

Build a business case: developing custom apps

The prosecutor in the Hans Reiser murder trial wrapped up more than two days of opening arguments Thursday by telling jurors a mound of evidence shows the well-known Linux developer killed his wife.

"One single reason explains it all, and that's that this man killed her," said Alameda County district attorney Paul Hora as he pointed at Reiser. The 43-year-old programmer and creator of the eponymous reiserfs filesystem for Linux then turned in his seat to look at Hora, according to news reports.

Reiser, who faces a possible life sentence if convicted, has pleaded not guilty. He claims his 31-year-old wife Nina Reiser fled the country after having an affair with his best friend. No body has been found since she disappeared in early September 2006, and there are no murder weapons or eyewitnesses linking Hans Reiser to his wife's disappearance.

Among the evidence Hora said proves Hans killed his wife were traces of her blood found in his Oakland, California, house and in the Honda Civic whose front seat Hans Reiser ripped out after the woman's disappearance.

Hora also played a recording of a phone conversation Hans Reiser had with his mother 20 days after Nina Reiser's disappearance. In it they discuss the couple's messy divorce battle and the programmer goes on to complain that the courts had wrongly deprived him of legal custody over his two children.

"He offers 10 minutes of reasons why Nina is dead," Hora told the jury.

William DuBois, Hans Reiser's attorney, moved for a mistrial, arguing that the taped conversation and a separate piece of evidence admitted into the trial, were inadmissible. Alameda County Superior Court Judge Larry Goodman denied the motion.

The trial is expected to last several months. ®

Coverage is available here from Wired News and here from the San Francisco Chronicle. ®

Bootnote

Articles about this trial will have comments disabled, until the verdict comes in.

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think

More from The Register

next story
14 antivirus apps found to have security problems
Vendors just don't care, says researcher, after finding basic boo-boos in security software
'Things' on the Internet-of-things have 25 vulnerabilities apiece
Leaking sprinklers, overheated thermostats and picked locks all online
iWallet: No BONKING PLEASE, we're Apple
BLE-ding iPhones, not NFC bonkers, will drive trend - marketeers
Multipath TCP speeds up the internet so much that security breaks
Black Hat research says proposed protocol will bork network probes, flummox firewalls
Only '3% of web servers in top corps' fully fixed after Heartbleed snafu
Just slapping a patched OpenSSL on a machine ain't going to cut it, we're told
Microsoft's Euro cloud darkens: US FEDS can dig into foreign servers
They're not emails, they're business records, says court
How long is too long to wait for a security fix?
Synology finally patches OpenSSL bugs in Trevor's NAS
Israel's Iron Dome missile tech stolen by Chinese hackers
Corporate raiders Comment Crew fingered for attacks
prev story

Whitepapers

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?