Feeds

Alicia Keys hit by MySpace Trojan hack

Fallin'

Remote control for virtualized desktops

This story was updated on Saturday, 10th November 2007 00:21 GMT to report additional details.

Multiple MySpace pages have been hacked in a bid to spread malware.

Targeted pages, including the site of R&B star Alicia Keys, have been loaded with links to Trojan horse malware that poses as a fake codec. As well as attempting to load the malware through a browser exploit the booby-trapped sites also attempt to trick users into downloading the fake codec.

Instead of using an iFrame injection method the poisoned profile uses an image map, so users clicking on anything over an area of a contaminated profile close to a pukka link will be taken to a maliciously-constructed website, hosted in China. The attack was discovered by Roger Thompson of Exploit Prevention Labs, who's posted an explanation of the attack along with a video here.

The discovery comes more than a week after researcher Chris Boyd published this post found similar shenanigans on myspace pages. The pages, Boyd found, had transparent overlays that linked to websites that tried to install malware, either by tricking a user into installing faux media codecs or by attempting to exploit vulnerable browsers. Thompson issued an apology to Boyd. "I didn't steal any of your work, and didn't mean to steal your thunder," he wrote.

As Thompson notes the beauty of the attack is that MySpace pages are such a pig's breakfast of clutter and multimedia files that would-be victims won't be surprised about having to load a codec and therefore all the more likely to fall for the ploy. It's unclear how many pages have been infected.

MySpace has increasingly become the subject of security concerns. In October 2005, a bug in MySpace's site design was misused to create a self-propagating cross-site scripting worm. More recently MySpace pages have been used to spread spyware, a trend continued in a more sophisticated form with the latest fake codecs attack. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
You really need to do some tech support for Aunty Agnes
Free anti-virus software, expires, stops updating and p0wns the world
Privacy bods offer GOV SPY VICTIMS a FREE SPYWARE SNIFFER
Looks for gov malware that evades most antivirus
Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins
Vulnerability promotes lusers to domain overlords ... oops
Oi, Europe! Tell US feds to GTFO of our servers, say Microsoft and pals
By writing a really angry letter about how it's harming our cloud business, ta
HACKERS can DELETE SURVEILLANCE DVRS remotely – report
Hikvision devices wide open to hacking, claim securobods
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
The hidden costs of self-signed SSL certificates
Exploring the true TCO for self-signed SSL certificates, including a side-by-side comparison of a self-signed architecture versus working with a third-party SSL vendor.