Feeds

Website for computer security experts hacked

Triple F get F for security?

Build a business case: developing custom apps

First Forensic Forum - a UK based association of computer security professionals - has been hacked.

F3.org's website was defaced (screen shot here) with a message poking fun at the association of computer forensic experts. The timing of the defacement on Thursday was fortuitous (or well planned) since the organisation is coming to the end of a two day conference.

The perpetrator of the attack posted a message taunting the organisation. "The F3 For Security Hacked. What's Happened In The world. Thay Are No Security Or What," S4udi-S3curity-T3rror writes.

Ouch. Well at least First Forensic Forum has no shortage of experts in recovering from security attacks to call on for help.

Curiously other pages (example) behind the front page defacement are operating normally. Defacements are the high-tech equivalent of digital graffiti. Normally they arise from misconfiguration of web server software or vulnerabilities left open by third party hosting firms or webmasters. Such attacks are generally trivial even though, when inflicted on security related organisations, no less embarrassing for all that. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Scale data protection with your virtual environment
To scale at the rate of virtualization growth, data protection solutions need to adopt new capabilities and simplify current features.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?