Feeds

Fatten or strip - the great Java debate

Sugary syntactical goodies

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

QCon Fundamental divisions over whether Java should be fattened up or have bits ripped out to suit changing requirements have emerged at an industry show.

A panel of industry experts at Qcon in San Francisco agreed Java should be left to enter its middle years without major changes and the industry should look for a "new language, soon".

As we all know, though, the devil is in the details. In this case, making Java easier to learn and to use was everyone's favorite topic.

While some wanted to add more APIs, others took a "less is more" approach, while others still supported the idea of a modular "core" framework" or a "consumer" friendly edition of Java.

After nods of agreement that Java should be allowed to mature gracefully and not make a fool of itself in mid-life, Spring father and Interface 21 chief executive Rod Johnson lit the touchpaper by calling for "negative growth" in the number of Java APIs in the JDK - especially old or leased used APIs - that he said are "hurting the platform".

Johnson singled out AWT which, a straw poll of QCon audience members revealed, is being used by precisely no one.

"We really need to take some hard decision because the size of the JDK is getting problematic.... It's naive to think there isn't pain at present. To think successive versions of Java get bigger and bigger - people take pot shots at Java, but we are giving them a bigger target," Johnson said.

Google's chief Java architect Joshua Bloch rode in and found surprising common ground with the only Java outsider - Erik Meijer, creator of Microsoft's LINQ, who cautioned the Java community against removing things from a platform or language once they are "out there".

"There are whole packages I'd like to drop," Bloch agreed. "But there are banks and insurance companies that have invested tens of millions of dollars in this, and if you don't support this you will ensure they don't progress forward."

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Euro Parliament VOTES to BREAK UP GOOGLE. Er, OK then
It CANNA do it, captain.They DON'T have the POWER!
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
NSA SOURCE CODE LEAK: Information slurp tools to appear online
Now you can run your own intelligence agency
Post-Microsoft, post-PC programming: The portable REVOLUTION
Code jockeys: count up and grab your fabulous tablets
Twitter App Graph exposes smartphone spyware feature
You don't want everyone to compile app lists from your fondleware? BAD LUCK
Microsoft adds video offering to Office 365. Oh NOES, you'll need Adobe Flash
Lovely presentations... but not on your Flash-hating mobe
prev story

Whitepapers

10 ways wire data helps conquer IT complexity
IT teams can automatically detect problems across the IT environment, spot data theft, select unique pieces of transaction payloads to send to a data source, and more.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Mitigating web security risk with SSL certificates
Web-based systems are essential tools for running business processes and delivering services to customers.