Feeds

Fatten or strip - the great Java debate

Sugary syntactical goodies

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

QCon Fundamental divisions over whether Java should be fattened up or have bits ripped out to suit changing requirements have emerged at an industry show.

A panel of industry experts at Qcon in San Francisco agreed Java should be left to enter its middle years without major changes and the industry should look for a "new language, soon".

As we all know, though, the devil is in the details. In this case, making Java easier to learn and to use was everyone's favorite topic.

While some wanted to add more APIs, others took a "less is more" approach, while others still supported the idea of a modular "core" framework" or a "consumer" friendly edition of Java.

After nods of agreement that Java should be allowed to mature gracefully and not make a fool of itself in mid-life, Spring father and Interface 21 chief executive Rod Johnson lit the touchpaper by calling for "negative growth" in the number of Java APIs in the JDK - especially old or leased used APIs - that he said are "hurting the platform".

Johnson singled out AWT which, a straw poll of QCon audience members revealed, is being used by precisely no one.

"We really need to take some hard decision because the size of the JDK is getting problematic.... It's naive to think there isn't pain at present. To think successive versions of Java get bigger and bigger - people take pot shots at Java, but we are giving them a bigger target," Johnson said.

Google's chief Java architect Joshua Bloch rode in and found surprising common ground with the only Java outsider - Erik Meijer, creator of Microsoft's LINQ, who cautioned the Java community against removing things from a platform or language once they are "out there".

"There are whole packages I'd like to drop," Bloch agreed. "But there are banks and insurance companies that have invested tens of millions of dollars in this, and if you don't support this you will ensure they don't progress forward."

Reducing security risks from open source software

More from The Register

next story
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Apple fanbois SCREAM as update BRICKS their Macbook Airs
Ragegasm spills over as firmware upgrade kills machines
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
Captain Kirk sets phaser to SLAUGHTER after trying new Facebook app
William Shatner less-than-impressed by Zuck's celebrity-only app
Do YOU work at Microsoft? Um. Are you SURE about that?
Nokia and marketing types first to get the bullet, says report
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.