Feeds

Microsoft spoils Christmas with Xbox 360 locking feature

Another excuse for the kids to hire a hitman

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

An upcoming Xbox 360 dashboard update in early December will add a "Family Timer" feature that lets parents set a limit on gaming time.

Merry Christmas, Billy! You have exactly two hours to enjoy your present.

Similar to the Windows Vista counterpart, the timer can restrict gaming on a per-day or per-week basis. When the alloted time runs out, the console will automatically turn off. Notifications will appear to warn the child when the end of the game session is nigh.

It should at least make gunning for the next save point more interesting.

The addition will help parents set boundaries for children, without the fuss of enforcing the rules themselves. There's no finer weaning than at the cold, uncompromising teat of mother technology. Then again, perhaps it's safer to keep your distance when pulling the plug.

The new feature will highlight Microsoft's second year of its "Safety is no game. Is your family set?" (yes, that's really the name) initiative with the Parent Teacher Association.

Xbox 360 family timer update

Oh well, who's up for a rousing game of hoop 'n' stick?

"As a leader in interactive entertainment, it's Microsoft's responsibility to provide parents with tools they can use to manage their children's video gaming and online experiences, and we have made that a priority from the very start," said Robbie Bach, head of Microsoft's entertainment division, in a statement.

American football star Jerry Rice was also a part of the announcement...for some reason. He quite touchingly stated that being a father was a greater accomplishment than both winning the Super Bowl and being a finalist on the reality show 'Dancing with the Stars.'

Even better than coming in third place on a reality show, Jerry? If teardrops ruin this keyboard, we're sending the bill to you.

This just in: Children often don't like rules restricting playtime

As a part of the announcement, Microsoft released the results of an independent research poll they sponsored on children's use of digital media.

The poll looked at 800 parents with children between the ages of five and 17 who have a video game console in their home. It showed that 45 per cent of parents say that enforcing rules about their children's media consumption creates tension at home. About 99 per cent have some rules, but only 47 per cent have "comprehensive" rules concerning access, content and time. The research also revealed that only 16 per cent of families are anal enough to put media-use rules in writing, and 40 per cent of parents involve children in related discussions. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
George Clooney, WikiLeaks' lawyer wife hand out burner phones to wedding guests
Day 4: 'News'-papers STILL rammed with Clooney nuptials
iPAD-FONDLING fanboi sparks SECURITY ALERT at Sydney airport
Breaches screening rules cos Apple SCREEN ROOLZ, ok?
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
The British Museum plonks digital bricks on world of Minecraft
Institution confirms it's cool with joining the blocky universe
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.