Feeds

Seagoing Missile Defence tests this week

US cruiser to stand off attack from Hawaii

Remote control for virtualized desktops

The US Missile Defence Agency (MDA) claims further success with test interceptions by its mobile land-based protective system, and plans a more complex trial of its seagoing component.

At the end of last month, the Theatre High Altitude Area Defence (THAAD) system successfully shot down (pdf) a non-separating target described by the MDA as "a 'SCUD'-type ballistic missile". THAAD is a lorry-mounted rocket which could defend relatively small areas against probably shorter-ranging ballistic warheads plunging out of the sky. It would be most useful protecting deployed US forces, or perhaps key areas of allied nations.

THAAD-type SCUD shield capability was believed to be in the US armoury as long ago as 1991, in the form of the Patriot air-defence missile of that day. However this turned out not to be the case. It seems that a protection against SCUDs is now, finally, in existence.

In a related development, Aviation Week reports that a further test will take place this week employing sea-based components of the MDA panoply.

The test will involve a single Ticonderoga-class Aegis cruiser, equipped with SM-3 Block 1A missile-busting interceptors. USS Lake Erie will be required to simultaneously detect and shoot down two targets representing fairly basic short-range enemy ballistic missiles, of the type already in service with various nations of interest. The targets will be fired from the missile range at Kauai in the Pacific.

Standard interceptors in their present form will probably never be able to knock down serious intercontinental missiles of the type employed by major world powers, but Aegis-type ships could be a useful defence against the sort of weapons employed by North Korea - or those which make up the majority of the Chinese arsenal. North Korea does have one intercontinental-type design, but when it was tested it blew up less than a minute off the pad.

Unsuprisingly, Japan is buying Aegis ships, and JS Kongo of the Japanese Maritime Self-defence Force will also participate in this week's test. However her missile firing will be simulated only.®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Bond villains lament as Wicked Lasers withdraw death ray
Want to arm that shark? Better get in there quick
Antarctic ice THICKER than first feared – penguin-bot boffins
Robo-sub scans freezing waters, rocks warming models
Your PHONE is slowly KILLING YOU
Doctors find new Digitillnesses - 'text neck' and 'telepressure'
SEX BEAST SEALS may be egging each other on to ATTACK PENGUINS
Boffin: 'I think the behaviour is increasing in frequency'
Reuse the Force, Luke: SpaceX's Elon Musk reveals X-WING designs
And a floating carrier for recyclable rockets
The next big thing in medical science: POO TRANSPLANTS
Your brother's gonna die, kid, unless we can give him your, well ...
NASA launches new climate model at SC14
75 days of supercomputing later ...
Renewable energy 'simply WON'T WORK': Top Google engineers
Windmills, solar, tidal - all a 'false hope', say Stanford PhDs
Britain's HUMAN DNA-strewing Moon mission rakes in £200k
3 days, and Kickstarter moves lander 37% nearer takeoff
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Seattle children’s accelerates Citrix login times by 500% with cross-tier insight
Seattle Children’s is a leading research hospital with a large and growing Citrix XenDesktop deployment. See how they used ExtraHop to accelerate launch times.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?