Feeds

Nicked DVLA documents used to sell stolen cars

Don't buy white vans or Beemers in pub carparks

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

The UK's top-cop alliance, ACPO*, is warning that buyers of secondhand vehicles are being duped using genuine V5C ownership logbooks stolen from the government motor licencing authority.

"It is believed that there are hundreds of stolen V5Cs currently in circulation," says a statement issued today by the ACPO Vehicle Crime Intelligence Service (AVCIS), noting that a "large number" were stolen from the Driver and Vehicle Licencing Authority (DVLA) in February. The DVLA itself has already issued two warnings this year.

It seems that the dodgy ownership documents have serial numbers between BG 9167501 and BG 9214000, though unscrupulous sellers frequently try to alter the numbers. Buyers in any doubt should check the number with the DVLA by phone on 0870 241 1878, as a database check will swiftly reveal a stolen vehicle.

"We are seeing too much of this type of crime," said Supt John Wake of AVCIS.

"Each crime tends to have more than one victim. Don't get caught out, make as many checks as you can before you commit to purchasing a vehicle. Never buy if you have any doubts. There are always more vehicles for sale than there are buyers."

Anyone who buys a stolen vehicle will lose their money, as the car will be seized as soon as it is registered. Attempts to recover money from the seller are frequently pointless, as they use false addresses and persuade foolish buyers to meet them at carparks, motorway service areas etc.

Apparently the vehicles most commonly sold using dodgy documents are "Ford Transits, Nissan Navaras, BMWs, Mercedes and Audis. It is believed that the Transits and Navaras are favoured as builders-type vehicles whereas the BMW, Audi and Mercedes are favoured as prestige vehicles. Often they are sold at or just under bottom book price and are sold for cash which sometimes acts as a sweetener to secure the sale."

Detailed advice on avoiding a ripoff from AVCIS can be read here. ®

*The Association of Chief Police Officers.

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
George Clooney, WikiLeaks' lawyer wife hand out burner phones to wedding guests
Day 4: 'News'-papers STILL rammed with Clooney nuptials
Shellshock: 'Larger scale attack' on its way, warn securo-bods
Not just web servers under threat - though TENS of THOUSANDS have been hit
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
PEAK IPV4? Global IPv6 traffic is growing, DDoS dying, says Akamai
First time the cache network has seen drop in use of 32-bit-wide IP addresses
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Researchers tell black hats: 'YOU'RE SOOO PREDICTABLE'
Want to register that domain? We're way ahead of you.
Stunned by Shellshock Bash bug? Patch all you can – or be punished
UK data watchdog rolls up its sleeves, polishes truncheon
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.