Feeds

Nicked DVLA documents used to sell stolen cars

Don't buy white vans or Beemers in pub carparks

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

The UK's top-cop alliance, ACPO*, is warning that buyers of secondhand vehicles are being duped using genuine V5C ownership logbooks stolen from the government motor licencing authority.

"It is believed that there are hundreds of stolen V5Cs currently in circulation," says a statement issued today by the ACPO Vehicle Crime Intelligence Service (AVCIS), noting that a "large number" were stolen from the Driver and Vehicle Licencing Authority (DVLA) in February. The DVLA itself has already issued two warnings this year.

It seems that the dodgy ownership documents have serial numbers between BG 9167501 and BG 9214000, though unscrupulous sellers frequently try to alter the numbers. Buyers in any doubt should check the number with the DVLA by phone on 0870 241 1878, as a database check will swiftly reveal a stolen vehicle.

"We are seeing too much of this type of crime," said Supt John Wake of AVCIS.

"Each crime tends to have more than one victim. Don't get caught out, make as many checks as you can before you commit to purchasing a vehicle. Never buy if you have any doubts. There are always more vehicles for sale than there are buyers."

Anyone who buys a stolen vehicle will lose their money, as the car will be seized as soon as it is registered. Attempts to recover money from the seller are frequently pointless, as they use false addresses and persuade foolish buyers to meet them at carparks, motorway service areas etc.

Apparently the vehicles most commonly sold using dodgy documents are "Ford Transits, Nissan Navaras, BMWs, Mercedes and Audis. It is believed that the Transits and Navaras are favoured as builders-type vehicles whereas the BMW, Audi and Mercedes are favoured as prestige vehicles. Often they are sold at or just under bottom book price and are sold for cash which sometimes acts as a sweetener to secure the sale."

Detailed advice on avoiding a ripoff from AVCIS can be read here. ®

*The Association of Chief Police Officers.

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Russian hackers exploit 'Sandworm' bug 'to spy on NATO, EU PCs'
Fix imminent from Microsoft for Vista, Server 2008, other stuff
FYI: OS X Yosemite's Spotlight tells Apple EVERYTHING you're looking for
It's on by default – didn't you read the small print?
Microsoft pulls another dodgy patch
Redmond makes a hash of hashing add-on
'LulzSec leader Aush0k' found to be naughty boy not worthy of jail
15 months home detention leaves egg on feds' faces as they grab for more power
Forget passwords, let's use SELFIES, says Obama's cyber tsar
Michael Daniel wants to kill passwords dead
Kill off SSL 3.0 NOW: HTTPS savaged by vicious POODLE
Pull it out ASAP, it is SWISS CHEESE
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.