Feeds

iPhone to solve UK unemployment

Is there anything it can't do?

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Not content with redefining the mobile phone and computer industries, the iPhone can now take credit for creating new jobs and saving the UK economy, apparently.

The news comes from O2, which is recruiting more than 1,400 new bods to help punters understand just how radically cool their new phone is, once it's launched on Friday.

Half the new staff will be in O2 stores showing customers how to setup their email and buy ringtones from the iTunes store, the other half will be in the O2 call centres explaining to punters why they have to buy their ringtones from the iTunes store and that being unable to install applications is a feature, not a restriction.

We're not clear why a handset which is famed for its ease of use requires 1,400 additional script-readers to help punters understand, but apparently it's "to ensure this good experience from the moment you purchase the iPhone through to activation and on-going support".

Given the way the iPhone has revolutionised all our lives even before we can (legally) buy one, and now is bringing new jobs to the UK economy, surely a knighthood for Steve can't be far off. ®

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?