Feeds

IBM lines up blade, AIX updates

AIX 6, Power 6, Uh-ho, now I'm scared...

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

IBM will sprinkle more greenery around its big computing offerings this week as it launches long-awaited updates to AIX and its Power-based server line.

The new OS and chip duo will be complemented by virtualisation software that will slot into the vendor's server consolidation – and by definition eco-conscious - pitch.

Big Blue discussed the Unix products earlier this week. The first blades running Power 6 are scheduled to be unveiled today, though the vendor has already blabbed some of the details to us.

The dual core Power 6, built with strained silicon, features an integrated memory controller. The combined effect is, apparently, to slash power consumption. The vendor has previously claimed the platform offers double the speed of the previous generation of chips for the same power draw, with obvious implications for server and data centre design. Starting prices, with hard disk, should be around the $10,000 mark.

New blades won't be much good without a suitable OS, and IBM has slated Friday for general availability of AIX 6. It's been six years since the vendor completely overhauled its flavour of Unix, and the industry has changed a lot in that time. The new OS will still be compatible with previous IBM chip platforms.

IBM has already flagged up features like virtualisation and kernel updates without the need to reboot. Virtualisation and partition features will allow live apps to be shifted around physical servers. The big push this week will be on high availability and power management, which ties in nicely with the latest chip platform.

It also ties in with the expected launch of Advanced Power Virtualisation Enterprise Edition later this month. This should give IT managers the ability to shift whole partitions around physical servers live, without having to reboot their systems. Among other benefits, this should allow updating and maintenance of systems during working hours when IT staff are still wide awake, not claiming overtime, and don't need all the lights on.

While server consolidation and more sensible maintenance routines have always appealed to server managers, IBM can now pitch these as power saving and therefore "green" features as well.

Last week, the vendor said it would offer data centres greenness certificates – overseen by a third party, of course - if they show they've reduced their power consumption. Now, what advice might IBM's green gurus offer any data centre manager looking to lower his power consumption. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway
Combine Blu-ray and M-DISC and you get this monster
US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux
OAM takes wireless signals to 32 Gbps
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Apple flops out 2FA for iCloud in bid to stop future nude selfie leaks
Millions of 4chan users howl with laughter as Cupertino slams stable door
Students playing with impressive racks? Yes, it's cluster comp time
The most comprehensive coverage the world has ever seen. Ever
Run little spreadsheet, run! IBM's Watson is coming to gobble you up
Big Blue's big super's big appetite for big data in big clouds for big analytics
Seagate's triple-headed Cerberus could SAVE the DISK WORLD
... and possibly bring us even more HAMR time. Yay!
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.