Feeds

VMware douses open source with waterfall of nonsense

Peace, love and lack of innovation

3 Big data security analytics techniques

With groin stimulating IPOs comes great responsibility.

Ah, let's be serious. With ludicrous IPOs, comes great nonsense.

For example, our recent interview with VMware CEO Diane Greene took place in the company's new waterfall room. This magical room is just like your average conference room except it has a large glass plate at one end with water constantly rushing down its face. This is the kind of thing you put in a conference room after you've spent millions on a new headquarters and conquered Wall Street.

The waterfall, however, is so damned loud that VMware has to turn it off when they have conference calls. It also trampled all over our audio collection of Greene's thoughts.

This is all a long way of saying that VMware tolerates nonsense in its offices but not in its code. Greene flat out dismissed our proposal that the company fly the freak flag by open sourcing its flagship code.

"There is still a lot of innovation going into our hypervisor," Greene told us. "As long as there is a lot of innovation going in, (open source) is not the right model.

"What we want to do is fund ourselves to be able to build new stuff. If you're purely open source, there is no way you can do new stuff."

Greene also added that VMware readily shares its APIs with partners and gives away free versions of its best-selling server virtualization software.

We've long thought VMware's position as a proprietary software maker will hurt it eventually. Part of VMware's charm comes from adding flexibility in the data center and routing around Microsoft's locks. But should VMware's popularity and dominance only grow, the company would seem to resemble Microsoft more and more.

In addition, VMware has an aura of serious computer science around it. The majority of people we talk to in the computer science field tend to have open source leanings. This is why Xen jumped out of nowhere to receive so much press and praise before its products let everyone down. Why fight against this crowd when you could be a shining example of open competition?

Greene, of course, has the luxury of playing things exactly how she prefers at the moment. VMware does not need to inspire interest in its products or tolerate the open source bandwagon nonsense.

We're quite sure that a company such as Sun Microsystems and maybe even Red Hat would take umbrage at Greene's suggestions that innovation cannot happen under the open source model. Both Sun and Red Hat "build new stuff" and hope to profit from it.

And with Sun you find an open source company that hopes its new stuff will be the very code that pulls people away from Linux's new stuff.

So, will VMware open source its code before it gets rid of the waterfall? Er, we doubt it. ®

Bootnote

We'll be discussing VMware's open source plans and much, more more on the upcoming edition of Open Season. Sponsors welcome. Also, in case you haven't noticed, we're having a virtualization e-Symposium next week. Do yourself a favor and attend. Click on any of the, oh, 200 ads around this story.

Register hack Ashlee Vance has just pumped out a new book that's a guide to Silicon Valley. The book starts with the electronics pioneers present in the Bay Area in the early 20th century and marches up to today's heavies. Want to know where Gordon Moore eats Chinese food, how unions affected the rise of microprocessors or how Fairchild Semiconductor got its start? This is the book for you - available at Amazon US here or in the UK here.

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Inside the Hekaton: SQL Server 2014's database engine deconstructed
Nadella's database sqares the circle of cheap memory vs speed
BOFH: Oh DO tell us what you think. *CLICK*
$%%&amp Oh dear, we've been cut *CLICK* Well hello *CLICK* You're breaking up...
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.