Feeds

Task force aims to improve US cybersecurity

'This is not a tech focus; it is a Washington focus'

The Power of One eBook: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

The commission aims to be nonpartisan and brings together 32 security experts, apart from the four people heading the panel. Among the experts are Idaho National Laboratories' infrastructure protection strategist Michael Assante, Oracle's chief technology officer Mary Ann Davidson, Princeton University professor of computer science Edward Felten, IBM Internet Security System's CEO Tom Noonan, and Verizon's executive director for national security policy Marcus Sachs.

As of yet, there is not firm agenda for the commission, said Sachs.

"There are no assumptions," he said. "Lets just get the cybersecurity experts together and see what comes out as an agenda."

Whether online attacks could constitute terrorism is still a matter of contention today, but the ability of Internet attackers to affect financial networks, power system, and infrastructure critical to the U.S. economy is not. For example, since March, the Department of Homeland Security has been showing power companies a video of a simulated attack against a power plant using a real vulnerability. In the video, a turbine dramatically overheats while smoke pours out.

"While cybersecurity in the U.S. has improved in the last five years, the threat model continues to change and the risks to U.S. security and economic well-being are steadily increasing," Microsoft's Charney, one of the four co-chairs of the commission, said in a statement sent to SecurityFocus. "Therefore, much still needs to be done."

The commission plans to have a report outlining their recommendations to give to the next president's transitional team in December 2008.

“The next President and their administration must be prepared to hit the ground and protect America’s cyber networks,” Rep. McCaul, the ranking member of the Homeland Security Subcommittee on Emerging Threats, Cyber Security and Science and Technology, said in a statement. “As it stands now this nation is severely challenged by current cyber attacks."

This article originally appeared in Security Focus.

Copyright © 2007, SecurityFocus

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

More from The Register

next story
Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade
Misc memory hazards 'could be exploited' - and guess what, one's a Javascript vuln
How long is too long to wait for a security fix?
Synology finally patches OpenSSL bugs in Trevor's NAS
Don't look, Snowden: Security biz chases Tails with zero-day flaws alert
Exodus vows not to sell secrets of whistleblower's favorite OS
Roll out the welcome mat to hackers and crackers
Security chap pens guide to bug bounty programs that won't fail like Yahoo!'s
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Researcher sat on critical IE bugs for THREE YEARS
VUPEN waited for Pwn2Own cash while IE's sandbox leaked
Four fake Google haxbots hit YOUR WEBSITE every day
Goog the perfect ruse to slip into SEO orfice
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.