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Mandriva bigwig (nearly) accuses Ballmer of b-word

17,000 Nigerian Linux boxes mysteriously switched to Windows

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Steve and the mirror

Just as the machines were being delivered, the Nigerians gave Bancilhon a bit of unexpected news: "We shall pay for the Mandriva Software as agreed," they told him, "but we shall replace it by Windows afterward."

Bancilhon thinks Ballmer has something to do with this little missive. "Wow! I’m impressed, Steve! What have you done for these guys to change their mind like this? It’s pretty clear to me, and it will be clear to everyone. How do you call what you just did Steve, in the place where you live? In my place, they give it various names, I’m sure you know them."

"Hey Steve," Bancilhon adds, "how do you feel looking at yourself in the mirror in the morning?"

Despite the news from Nigeria, Bancilhon vows to battle on. "I will keep fighting this one and the next one, and the next one. You have the money, the power, and maybe we have a different sense of ethics you and I, but I believe that hard work, good technology and ethics can win too."

And with a post script, he urges the Nigerians to change their mind. Again. "PS: a message to our friends in Nigeria: it’s still time to do the right thing and make the right choice, you will get lots of support for it and excellent services!"

We asked Microsoft how the company managed to convince the Nigerians that they should switch to Windows after they'd already paid for Mandriva, and this is what it said: "Microsoft operates its business in accordance both with the laws of the countries in which it operates and with international law. Microsoft does not comment on customer procurement processes."

The company also failed to tell us whether it's Windows Vista the Nigerians plan on installing over Mandriva. Whatever trick Ballmer has pulled, we're worried all those Nigerian school children will soon be using an OS that has difficulty running more than one application at a time.

Update

Microsoft has sent us another email on this issue. The company also wanted to point out that Windows is better than Linux:

Microsoft strongly believes that individuals, governments and other organisations should be free to choose the software and other technologies that best meet their needs. We believe Microsoft offers the best overall option of value, integration, interoperability and support, without complexity or added dependency on services.

We are seeing strong market demand for Windows on low-cost devices to help governments in the areas of education, local innovation, and jobs and opportunity. We find that the government agencies are looking at the complete picture - bringing the benefits of technology to more people requires software, hardware, training, well-designed curricula, and stimulating sustainable local business ecosystems.

Microsoft has a strong relationship with the government in Nigeria and will continue to partner with government and industry to help meet their needs.

We have no doubt that the company has "a strong relationship with the government in Nigeria." ®

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