Feeds

Apple's Leopard leaps into action

Two million copies and counting

The essential guide to IT transformation

Apple has sold two million copies of Leopard, the latest version of its Mac OS X operating system, since its release on Friday. The company said the Leopard sales rush outpaced that of its predecessor Tiger, until now the most successful Apple operating system.

The two million sales figure includes copies of Leopard sold at Apple retail stores, Apple authorised resellers, the online Apple Store, under maintenance agreements and those copies bundled with newly shipping Macs.

Leopard, which is priced at $129 in the US, is the sixth major release of Mac OS X. It has over 300 new features, including visual improvements, refinements to the Finder search tool, a 'Time Machine' automated backup system and greater user-friendliness overall. But observers have been quick to point out flaws in the OS, including a Windows-like 'Blue Screen of Death' experienced by some users while installing the software as well as its apparent incompatibility with the latest version of the Java programming language.

Meanwhile, resourceful online hackers have already figured out how to successfully install Leopard on Windows-based PCs. Users on the 'OSx86 Scene' forum have released details of how Windows users can migrate to Apple's new OS, without investing in new hardware - even though installing Leopard on a PC may run contrary to Apple's terms and conditions.

The process is not a straightforward one: simply placing a Leopard retail DVD into a PC will not work, since it contains a file format that's readable only on Macs. It is instead necessary to get hold of an ISO image of Leopard, apply a patch to get that image to install, and then fool the PC into loading the whole thing from a USB drive.

This is the latest chapter in Apple's ongoing struggle with hackers. The launch of the company's much-touted iPhone has been followed by ongoing efforts to prevent hackers 'unlocking' the device to allow it to work on mobile networks other than Apple's exclusive US partner AT&T.

© 2007 ENN

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.