Feeds

Apple's Leopard leaps into action

Two million copies and counting

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Apple has sold two million copies of Leopard, the latest version of its Mac OS X operating system, since its release on Friday. The company said the Leopard sales rush outpaced that of its predecessor Tiger, until now the most successful Apple operating system.

The two million sales figure includes copies of Leopard sold at Apple retail stores, Apple authorised resellers, the online Apple Store, under maintenance agreements and those copies bundled with newly shipping Macs.

Leopard, which is priced at $129 in the US, is the sixth major release of Mac OS X. It has over 300 new features, including visual improvements, refinements to the Finder search tool, a 'Time Machine' automated backup system and greater user-friendliness overall. But observers have been quick to point out flaws in the OS, including a Windows-like 'Blue Screen of Death' experienced by some users while installing the software as well as its apparent incompatibility with the latest version of the Java programming language.

Meanwhile, resourceful online hackers have already figured out how to successfully install Leopard on Windows-based PCs. Users on the 'OSx86 Scene' forum have released details of how Windows users can migrate to Apple's new OS, without investing in new hardware - even though installing Leopard on a PC may run contrary to Apple's terms and conditions.

The process is not a straightforward one: simply placing a Leopard retail DVD into a PC will not work, since it contains a file format that's readable only on Macs. It is instead necessary to get hold of an ISO image of Leopard, apply a patch to get that image to install, and then fool the PC into loading the whole thing from a USB drive.

This is the latest chapter in Apple's ongoing struggle with hackers. The launch of the company's much-touted iPhone has been followed by ongoing efforts to prevent hackers 'unlocking' the device to allow it to work on mobile networks other than Apple's exclusive US partner AT&T.

© 2007 ENN

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
Sway: Microsoft's new Office app doesn't have an Undo function
Content aggregation, meet the workplace ... oh
Sign off my IT project or I’ll PHONE your MUM
Honestly, it’s a piece of piss
Return of the Jedi – Apache reclaims web server crown
.london, .hamburg and .公司 - that's .com in Chinese - storm the web server charts
NetWare sales revive in China thanks to that man Snowden
If it ain't Microsoft, it's in fashion behind the Great Firewall
Chrome 38's new HTML tag support makes fatties FIT and SKINNIER
First browser to protect networks' bandwith using official spec
Admins! Never mind POODLE, there're NEW OpenSSL bugs to splat
Four new patches for open-source crypto libraries
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.