Feeds

Print beats net for fraud

Scammers still prefer old-world means, FTC study shows

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

With Nigerian 419 scams, phishing attempts and other dubious spam flooding your inbox, you may be tempted to think the net is the epicenter for today's shysters. But it turns out print advertising beat out the internet as the most common means for spreading fraudulent pitches, according to a US consumer survey released Monday by the Federal Trade Commission.

Direct mail, flyers and ads in newspapers and magazines were used to hawk fraudulent schemes for 27 percent of reported incidents, compared with 22 per cent for websites and email. Television and radio came in a close third at 21 per cent. Telemarketing accounted for nine per cent, according to the US government agency.

The survey counted only scams that American citizens fell victim to, rather than attempted scams that nobody bought. This may explain why most of us can produce dozens of internet-borne come-ons trying to fool us into giving up banking credentials, but comparatively few printed materials aimed at defrauding us. Still, the statistical survey of fraud in the US is a reminder that internet is a vehicle for only a small portion of the schemes that defraud.

Fraudulent weight-loss products hoodwinked 4.8 million people, making them the most common form of fraud. Tying for second with 3.2 million were foreign lottery scams and buyers' club memberships. In foreign lottery scams, consumers are told they have won a lottery they never entered, but must surrender personal information or a pay a fee to receive their winnings. Victims of phony club memberships are billed for the privilege of joining.

Ranking third, fourth and fifth respectively were: Fraudulent prize promotions, which fail to deliver a promised reward in exchange for making a purchase or attending a sales presentation; work-at-home programs, in which the victim earned less than was promised; and pitches for phony credit-card insurance.

In all, 30.2 million US adults - 13.5 per cent of the adult population - were victims of fraud over a 12-month period that started in November 2004. So it is entirely possible that the internet has assumed greater weight in than other mediums in fraudsters' schemes since then.

The FTC's report summary is available here. ®

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

More from The Register

next story
Israeli spies rebel over mass-snooping on innocent Palestinians
'Disciplinary treatment will be sharp and clear' vow spy-chiefs
Infosec geniuses hack a Canon PRINTER and install DOOM
Internet of Stuff securo-cockups strike yet again
'Speargun' program is fantasy, says cable operator
We just might notice if you cut our cables
Apple Pay is a tidy payday for Apple with 0.15% cut, sources say
Cupertino slurps 15 cents from every $100 purchase
YouTube, Amazon and Yahoo! caught in malvertising mess
Cisco says 'Kyle and Stan' attack is spreading through compromised ad networks
Hackers pop Brazil newspaper to root home routers
Step One: try default passwords. Step Two: Repeat Step One until success
Greater dev access to iOS 8 will put us AT RISK from HACKERS
Knocking holes in Apple's walled garden could backfire, says securo-chap
Microsoft to patch ASP.NET mess even if you don't
We know what's good for you, because we made the mess says Redmond
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.