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Chiltern Railways completes mobile phone ticketing circle

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Passengers on Chiltern Railways will soon be able to buy their tickets through their mobile phone, as opposed to just storing them there as they already do.

The latest development means that a passenger can buy the ticket, receive it as a message (displaying a bar code) onto their phone and then flash the handset at the automatic gates at Marylebone to get onto the train, all without dealing with a single human being.

The barcode-tickets came into operation back in December last year, and the automated barriers were fitted to the London station in April, so users can buy tickets over the Internet for delivery to their mobile, but the truly-mobile purchasing option wasn't possible until now.

Security is provided by Masabi, using their lightweight Java encryption, which enables a local application to securely take credit card information, and issue the tickets.

But that's only for 50 customers right now, as the technology is going to have a two-month trial before being unleashed on the public. Subsequently we'll all be able to stride past the ticket queues in search of a decent mobile phone signal in order to buy tickets. ®

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