Feeds

Are PCs doomed to banality? Let's ask legend Dave Patterson

Microsoft RAMPs up, while Google flies

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Radio Reg Talk to a computing legend like Dave Patterson, and you're bound to happen on some unexpected discoveries.

The Berkeley professor and RISC/RAID pioneer this week joined Chris Hipp and me for Episode 9 of Semi-Coherent Computing. Patterson surprised the heck out of us with some off topic news that Google is paying for employees to obtain their commercial pilot licenses. Does the ad broker want to put its data centers closer to satellites by flying them around non-stop? Perhaps.

We also coaxed a couple of on-topic scoops out of Patterson. For example, Microsoft's Chuck Thacker - he of the Alto - has teamed with Berkeley on a multi-threaded software research effort. The partnership will see Microsoft buy and even build a number of Berkeley's RAMP boards.

Next month, Patterson and his cohorts at Berkeley plan to reveal even fresher multi-core research by discussing their work on the mobile computing front. We'll have news on that project when it arrives.

Turning back to the show, Patterson allowed us to pick his brain for close to an hour. We covered his initial RISC designs, RAID work and the RAMP effort.

In addition, we hit on the great debate between Berkeley and Stanford, the next-generation of RAID being put forward by Panasas, Sun's Niagara processors, crappy hard disks and Ivan Sutherland's latest work.

As if that weren't enough, Patterson told us about his big concerns for the computing industry, while Chris and I celebrated Sun co-founder Andy Bechtolsheim as the world's hardest working billionaire.

I want to issue some sincere apologies for the audio quality near the end of the program. Skype just seems to hate wireless connections, and Patterson's line broke down a bit over time. Nonetheless, this was a heck of a show, and I suspect you'll enjoy it.

Semi-Coherent Computing - Episode 9

You can also grab the show off iTunes here or subscribe to the show via this feed.

Thanks for your ears. ®

Register hack Ashlee Vance has just pumped out a new book that's a guide to Silicon Valley. The book starts with the electronics pioneers present in the Bay Area in the early 20th century and marches up to today's heavies. Want to know where Gordon Moore eats Chinese food, where Steve Jobs and Bono hang out or how Fairchild Semiconductor got its start? This is the book for you - available at Amazon US here or in the UK here.

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Trousers down for six of the best affordable Androids
Stylish Googlephones for not-so-deep pockets
Intel's LAME DUCK mobile chips gobbled by CASH COW
Chipzilla won't have money-losing mobe unit to kick about anymore
First in line to order a Nexus 6? AT&T has a BRICK for you
Black Screen of Death plagues early Google-mobe batch
Ford's B-Max: Fiesta-based runaround that goes THUNK
... when you close the slidey doors, that is ...
prev story

Whitepapers

Seattle children’s accelerates Citrix login times by 500% with cross-tier insight
Seattle Children’s is a leading research hospital with a large and growing Citrix XenDesktop deployment. See how they used ExtraHop to accelerate launch times.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Protecting against web application threats using SSL
SSL encryption can protect server‐to‐server communications, client devices, cloud resources, and other endpoints in order to help prevent the risk of data loss and losing customer trust.