Feeds

'Fiendish' Trojan pickpockets eBay users

It's new and improved. And it just nabbed $8,600

High performance access to file storage

The malware appears to be a reworking of Trojan.Bayrob, which first came to light in early March when researchers from Symantec wrote reports here and here.

It arrives in an attachment to an email responding to a bid and installs a local proxy server that redirects traffic bound for eBay. The proxy, according to Symantec, spoofs sensitive pages on eBay, including the "ask a question" messaging feature for online auctions. The Trojan also inflates the user feedback score of the purported buyer, according to Symantec.

In the intervening seven months, the Trojan has been updated so that, among other things, traffic bound for sites such as Carfax and nine other addresses maintained by third-party companies will also be redirected. This helps thwart victims who try to independently confirm details fed on the falsified eBay pages.

eBay spokeswoman Nichola Sharpe says the company's security team has forwarded samples of the new strain to anti-virus companies so they can add it to the updates they send to customers.

Bogus location

When the Ohio victim used her infected PC to get a history of the Jeep from Carfax, she was told the vehicle was in California, a detail that was consistent with what scammers were telling her. Using a clean computer to access the same information shows the Jeep is located in Pennsylvania.

Seeing no reason to doubt the authenticity of the auction, the victim paid $8,650 on October 4 using a bank-to-bank transfer, a payment method that is approved by eBay. She has yet to receive delivery of the Jeep, and the purported seller has since become unreachable.

Although eBay Motors promises to protect purchases up to $20,000 against fraud, the company is refusing to cover the costs of the Ohio victim. "Items purchased outside of eBay are not covered, including those bought directly from a seller," a customer representative wrote in an email to the victim.

The victim, a college-educated stay-at-home mother, said she kept on top of her Windows updates, ran security software from Symantec and was careful not to fall for the ploy of phishers. eBay's security team says she got infected after clicking on the email attachment sent in response to her bid. She said it never occurred to her that a bid she made on eBay would leave her open to an attack that would completely compromise her system.

So she has opted to close down her eBay and PayPal accounts and vowed never again to do business with the company.

I don't have a right to be on there because I'm not knowledgeable about everything [criminals] are pulling there these days, she said. "I assumed I was purchasing this through eBay so my guard was down. As high-tech as this was, I don't know what I would have done differently." ®

If you have intelligence about Trojan.Bayrob or other scams targeting eBay, please contact Dan Goodin using this link.

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker
Natter-board tells middle-class Britain to purée its passwords
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
German space centre endures cyber attack
Chinese code retrieved but NSA hack not ruled out
NSA denies it knew about and USED Heartbleed encryption flaw for TWO YEARS
Agency forgets it exists to protect communications, not just spy on them
Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released
File under 'this is going to hurt you more than it hurts me'
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
HP ArcSight ESM solution helps Finansbank
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.