Feeds

International manhunt tracks pedophile suspect to Thailand

Unscrambled pics yield more than 350 tips

High performance access to file storage

Police who unmasked a suspected pedophile and posted his picture online have identified the man and say he is at large somewhere in Thailand thanks to an international campaign that yielded tips from more than 350 people.

Photo of man with receding hairline

A photo taken by Thai immigration authorities

The man, whom Interpol declined to publicly identify for "investigative reasons," was photographed by security cameras at the Bangkok airport last week. He had been working as a teacher of English at a school in South Korea but was forced to flee shortly after the international police organization issued a public appeal for help in tracking him down. Police say they have determined the man's name, nationality, date of birth, passport number and current and previous work places.

Codenamed "Vico," the man was allegedly shown in 200 online photographs in which he sexually assaults 12 young boys in Vietnam and Cambodia. The face in the photos had been digitally altered so it couldn't be identified. When Interpol figured out a way to largely restore the original image, they published the photo of the man on their website and asked for help in identifying the suspect.

More than 350 people responded to last week's appeal, Interpol said. The suspect was identified from information provided by five people on three continents. Interpol said it was the first time it had made a worldwide appeal to the public to track down a suspect.

The images show a white male with a receding hairline who is occasionally bespectacled. Police are continuing to investigate Vico.

"We must once again enlist the public's support, this time to pinpoint Vico's current location," Interpol Secretary General Ronald Noble said in a statement.

Anyone with information about the suspect can contact Interpol here. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker
Natter-board tells middle-class Britain to purée its passwords
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts
Bloke behind the cockup says not enough people are helping crucial crypto project
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
German space centre endures cyber attack
Chinese code retrieved but NSA hack not ruled out
Experian subsidiary faces MEGA-PROBE for 'selling consumer data to fraudster'
US attorneys general roll up sleeves, snap on gloves
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
HP ArcSight ESM solution helps Finansbank
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.