Feeds

Digital downloads get pop-tastic applause

Musical deathmatch with Queen of Pop as ring master

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Unless you've been living under a rock recently you'll have noticed that the digital music industry has been flip-flopping all over the place this week.

First up, music licensing company Snocap today confirmed that it had reduced its staff headcount by 60 per cent.

The San Francisco-based firm, which had been the latest e-commerce venture from Napster founder Shawn Fanning alongside biz partners Jordan Mendelson, and Ron Conway, is said to be up for sale according to a blog post on ValleyWag.

It was created in 2002 in a, some might say, ambitious attempt to legally sell copy-protected music files on P2P networks by taking care of licensing and copyright issues on behalf of artists wanting to punt their musical wares online.

As ValleyWag points out, however, the firm's apparent decline could in part be attributed to the fact that there is less call for such a business model in a music industry fast moving towards a DRM-free future.

Elsewhere, Madonna has decided to ditch her long-running relationship with record label Warner Music Group (WMG) in a move that many commentators have, perhaps prematurely, seen as the nail in the coffin for the old way of doing business with record companies.

The pop Queen's latest reinvention will see her leave WMG after a quarter of a decade with the firm. Various reports say Madonna is expected to sign a $120m ten-year deal with concert promotion firm Live Nation.

It's a move that doesn't take much working out. Apparently, Madonna's album sales have continued to decline while her live, pricey shows have proved extremely popular among her fans.

Of course, Radiohead had already declared a touchy-feely attitude of "who needs them anyway?" The label-less band recently asked its army of fans to name the price for digital downloads of its latest CD.

And we've not even got on to talking about everyone's favourite media punchbag Britney Spears, yet. But what the hell, it is a Friday.

The troubled star's music label, in a bid to stop the party getting started, yesterday said it had filed a copyright infringement suit in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles against gossip website Perez Hilton.

According to Reuters, Jive Records, which is a division of Sony BMG Music Entertainment's Zomba Label Group, has accused the popular site, and its owner Mario Lavandeira, of posting illegal recordings during the past three months of our Brit's forthcoming album, the somewhat aptly named Blackout. No pathos intended.

And finally, a new study has revealed that music-buying trends continue to point to a surge in sales online.

Market analysts Verdict said that UK digital downloads will be up more than 45 per cent on last year, worth £163m to the music and video industry in 2007.

Verdict, in its UK Music and Video Retailers 2007 report, also predicted that digital spending will continue to rise and that it could reach £600m a year by 2012.

It said: "While piracy will continue and CD volumes will decline further, most retailers are better placed to cope with market challenges... Digital downloading is starting to pick up pace and has much potential." ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
BBC: We're going to slip CODING into kids' TV
Pureed-carrot-in-ice cream C++ surprise
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Twitter: La la la, we have not heard of any NUDE JLaw, Upton SELFIES
If there are any on our site it is not our fault as we are not a PUBLISHER
Facebook, Google and Instagram 'worse than drugs' says Miley Cyrus
Italian boffins agree with popette's theory that haters are the real wrecking balls
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
Ex-IBM CEO John Akers dies at 79
An era disrupted by the advent of the PC
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?