Feeds

RIM settles SureType patent infringement spat

Licenses predictive text tech from Eatoni

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Research In Motion (RIM) has reached an agreement with Eatoni Ergonomics, a little-known developer of predictive text input software for mobile devices, who claimed the Canadian company's BlackBerry incorporated technology it had no right to use.

Neither party would disclose the full terms of the deal, but they include RIM making an unspecified equity investment in Eatoni in return for a licence to use the smaller firm's intellectual property. They will also co-operate on next-gen text prediction technologies.

Eatoni took RIM to court back in 2005, claiming various BlackBerries with two-letter-per-key keyboards, such as the 7100 series and later devices like the Pearl, violate US Patent 6,885,317, which Eatoni had been granted in April of that year.

Patent 6,885,317 details "touch-typable devices based on ambiguous codes and methods to design such devices". Mobile phone owners who use the T9 system will be familiar with the idea, but Eatoni's dictionary-less, language-agnostic approach is significantly better. We know, we've tried it. So have plenty of cordless phone users - Eatoni's technology has been licensed to quite a few DECT-handset makers.

The BlackBerry 7100, launched in 2004, introduced SureType, RIM's technology to allow users to press a single key and have the device work out whether they want, say, a Q or a W, to appear on the screen. That, Eatoni claimed, is exactly what patent 6,885,317 discussed when it applied for the patent in December 1999, long before RIM released the 7100.

RIM initially attempted to have Eatoni's patent declared invalid, but Eatoni countersued, alleging patent infringement and asking the court to ban the sale of RIM's allegedly infringing products. As usual, the US District Court of Northern Texas told the two companies to try mediation first, and in this case the negotiations proved successful.

Neither side has agreed to withdraw their allegations, instead choosing to settle the case "with prejudice", presumably in order to avoid further costly legal entanglements. ®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
Leaked pics show EMBIGGENED iPhone 6 screen
Fat-fingered fanbois rejoice over Chinternet snaps
Oh no, Joe: WinPhone users already griping over 8.1 mega-update
Hang on. Which bit of Developer Preview don't you understand?
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
True optical zoom coming to HTC smartphone cameras
Time to ditch that heavy DSLR? Maybe in a year, year and a half
Rounded corners? Pah! Amazon's '3D phone has eye-tracking tech'
Now THAT'S what we call a proper new feature
Feast your PUNY eyes on highest resolution phone display EVER
Too much pixel dust for your strained eyeballs to handle
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Leaked photos may indicate slimmer next-generation iPad
Will iPad Air evolve into iPad Helium?
US mobile firms cave on kill switch, agree to install anti-theft code
Slow and kludgy rollout will protect corporate profits
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.