Feeds

Dell boots disks and fires up streamed PCs

Thin clients and blades are for the weak

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Forget thin clients and blade PCs. Dell will do the virtual desktop thing in its own, less than radical way.

Dell today announced a streamed desktop package that will allow customers to manage up to 100 PCs from a single server. As you might expect, Dell will rely on Citrix's Provisioning Server for Desktops software to send copies of an operating system out from the data center to PCs. By controlling PCs from the server room, Dell thinks customers can cut down on their security risks and management costs - a familiar refrain for anyone familiar with the server-based PC model.

Rivals such as HP, IBM and Sun Microsystems have embraced more dramatic approaches to this sort of virtual PC. Sun, for example, has spent years hyping the thin client where you basically have a smarter than average monitor connect to a server. For its part, HP has thin clients and blade PCs. IBM has followed a similar approach but recently rolled up something kind of unique by partnering with a start-up called Teradici around a super-charged blade PC.

Dell claims that both thin clients and blade PCs require too many tradeoffs to please its customers. Thin clients often suffer from a lag, while blade PCs can be restrictive in the number of users tied to each machine.

So, Dell has simply decided to remove the hard disks from its PCs and put all the storage in the data center.

The company's On-Demand Desktop Streaming, er, offering will consist of diskless OptiPlex 745 and 755 desktops (shipping in Nov.), a PowerEdge 2950 server, a PowerConnect Gigabit switch, the Citrix software and a PowerEdge 2900 storage box. For the time being the streamed desktop bundle will only go to US customers.

Dell promises that end users will see "no difference" from their usual experience.

In the meantime, administrators will handle all of the Windows - and this is a Windows only thing - management from a central place. This can make installing patches and updates much easier. In addition, it offers significant security gains, since users do not have their actual hard drives and since software images can be restored with a couple of clicks if a virus hits .

The new streaming package will cost $1,100 per seat along with the hardware costs. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
NSA SOURCE CODE LEAK: Information slurp tools to appear online
Now you can run your own intelligence agency
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
Cloud unicorns are extinct so DiData cloud mess was YOUR fault
Applications need to be built to handle TITSUP incidents
Stop the IoT revolution! We need to figure out packet sizes first
Researchers test 802.15.4 and find we know nuh-think! about large scale sensor network ops
Turnbull should spare us all airline-magazine-grade cloud hype
Box-hugger is not a dirty word, Minister. Box-huggers make the cloud WORK
SanDisk vows: We'll have a 16TB SSD WHOPPER by 2016
Flash WORM has a serious use for archived photos and videos
Astro-boffins start opening universe simulation data
Got a supercomputer? Want to simulate a universe? Here you go
Microsoft adds video offering to Office 365. Oh NOES, you'll need Adobe Flash
Lovely presentations... but not on your Flash-hating mobe
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.