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Sun ships Niagara II servers

High-throughput chip launched in two racks and a blade

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Sun Microsystems is primed to ship the first servers running its UltraSPARC T2 processor, aka Niagara II.

The roll-out consists of a pair of rack-mounted systems and a blade server based on the new chip, which sports eight cores and eight threads per core.

The single-rack T5120 and double-rack T5520 have a single socket design and 64GB of memory. Both can run either a 1.2GHz or 1.4GHz processor. The 5120 holds up to four hot-swappable drives, while its more spacious cousin, the 5520, holds eight. The T6320 is basically the T5120 in a single wide blade design.

Each system supports the latest version of Solaris OS, with virtualization capabilities in Solaris Containers and Logical Domains (LDoms).

T5120 and T5220 servers are available now, with a list starting price of $13,995. The blade won't ship until October 24. The servers will also be sold through Fujitsu, which has pact with Sun to resell each other's gear. ®

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