Feeds

Eircom moves closer to split

Reports of submission confirmed

Intelligent flash storage arrays

The Irish Department of Communications has confirmed reports that Eircom has made a submission regarding splitting the company.

A spokeswoman for the Department told ENN that Eircom made the submission recently and that the Minister for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources, Eamon Ryan, is currently studying it.

"It's a private firm so it can split if it wants, but obviously the department would be interested in ensuring the move benefited consumers," said the spokeswoman. "Were there a split then there would probably be new regulations put in place to ensure consumers were treated fairly."

She said any new regulations would follow consultation between Eircom, the Department, and ComReg. The spokeswoman added that the submission covered a wide range of areas aside from the split, including broadband and next generation networks.

A spokesman for Eircom said the telco was not commenting on whether any decision regarding a potential split had been made but that it was an option the firm was considering. "Separation is something we want to explore further."

The prospect of Eircom parent Babcock & Brown selling off the telco's retail and mobile arm while retaining the lucrative wholesale arm was first mooted in July, with the potential sale valued at €1.8bn, not bad considering the Australian investment firm paid €2.4bn for the entire company when it bought Eircom in 2006.

The Department of Communications told ENN the Programme for Government was in favour of a split in Eircom; despite this potential backing though the former incumbent may still face some obstacles before a division is complete.

In August, unions aired their disapproval of the prospect of a split in the firm. At the time the Communications Workers Union, the largest Eircom union, said it would use "all means at its disposal" to oppose a split and was unhappy with the way the proposal had been managed.

The road ahead may be lucrative for Eircom but it's likely to encounter a bump or two on the way.

© 2007 ENN

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Spies, avert eyes! Tim Berners-Lee demands a UK digital bill of rights
Lobbies tetchy MPs 'to end indiscriminate online surveillance'
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.